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Cinema Verde Presents: Water
Water. Directed By. Maxim Akbarov. Coming Soon. 16. Minutes. Short. Kazakhstan. The film ‘Water’ is based on the Greek myth of Prometheus, who sacrificed his life for other people.

The film ‘Water’ is based on the Greek myth of Prometheus, who sacrificed his life for other people. The theme of the film is the complexity of environmental issues facing modern society and which modern science does not keep up with. The plot is based on real events that from time to time get into the media.‍ A man in a business suit is the Antihero of our time. On the one hand, a modern capitalist who is ready to do anything for profit, on the other - an equally relevant populist who easily juggles ideas and meanings, confusing the public, confusing tracks and often avoiding responsibility due to this. Aydin is the hero of our time - A modern Prometheus. A man who is ready for anything, even to sacrifice his life in order to open the eyes of others, to save them. Young journalists are representatives of modern youth who are not yet able to influence the situation. Other media representatives are Journalists whose search for sensations in order to attract the attention of the maximum audience often leads to positive results. Coming Soon

Cinema Verde Presents: Water Warriors
Water Warriors. Directed By. Michael Premo. Past Presentation. 22. Minutes. Fracking. United States. The story of a community’s successful fight to protect their water from the oil and natural gas industry.

The story of a community’s successful fight to protect their water from the oil and natural gas industry. In 2013, Texas-based SWN Resources arrived in New Brunswick, Canada, a region known for forestry, farming, and fishing, both commercial and small-scale subsistence operations that the rural community depend on. A multicultural group of unlikely warriors united and set up road blockades to prevent oil exploration. After months of resistance, their efforts not only halted drilling, they elected a new government and won an indefinite moratorium on fracking. Past Presentation

Cinema Verde Presents: We Are Water
We Are Water. Directed By. Jill Heinerth. Past Presentation. TRAILER. 53. Minutes. Documentary; Water; Ocean. United States. Co-executive producer, Jill Heinerth, who hails from Alachua County, has dived deeper into caves than any woman in history.

Co-executive producer, Jill Heinerth, who hails from Alachua County, has dived deeper into caves than any woman in history. Her accolades include being named a "Living Legend" by Sport Diver Magazine and being in the inaugural class of the Women Divers Hall of Fame. Imaginative, entertaining, and enlightening, We Are Water illustrates the fragile relationship between our planet's endangered freshwater resources and the ever increasing needs of more and more people: For the first time in history, fresh water has become a finite resource. Without big changes in water policy and use, wars of the future may be fought, not over oil, but water. This movie will show us how we can help Jill Heinerth to keep that from happening. Past Presentation

GoGreenNation News: Racism surfaces in water war
Racism surfaces in water war. Friday, June 25, 2021.

This year, the conflict is more intense than before, with a faction of far-right activists threatening to use force to take control of the irrigation gates that determine how much water stays in the lake and how much goes to farm fields. The lake, about a hundred miles around, received little snow melt and is shallow enough to walk across in places. Later this summer, as in past years, it is likely to be too hot and toxic for the c’waam and another variety of federally protected suckerfish, the koptu, to spawn and survive.

Cinema Verde Presents: Owsia (Darkened Water)
Owsia (Darkened Water). Directed By. Alireza Dehghan. Past Presentation. TRAILER. 31. Minutes. Water; Pollution. Iran. Owsia (Darkened Water) tells the story of the aqueduct of Iranian city Yazd that has supplied water for hundreds of years.

Owsia (Darkened Water) tells the story of the aqueduct of Iranian city Yazd that has supplied water for hundreds of years. Now, the 2500 year old structure rots due to bureaucracy and corruption. Wastewater pollution is poisoning the pure and clean water that ran through the aqueduct during 84 kms of current. Past Presentation

Cinema Verde Presents: Who Owns Water?
Who Owns Water? Directed By. Michael and David Hanson. Past Presentation. TRAILER. 50. Minutes. Fresh Water Drought. United States. It's a conflict once unthinkable in the deep green South.

It's a conflict once unthinkable in the deep green South. Three states are locked in battle over the diminishing fresh water that saw Atlanta go from a small town to the largest growing city in the US. In this stunningly-shot, award-winning documentary film, brothers Michael and David Hanson return to the source of their childhood river and paddle it to the Gulf of Mexico to take you deep into the Water Wars. Past Presentation

Cinema Verde Presents: Carbon for Water
Carbon for Water. Directed By. Carmen Elsa Lopez Abramson, Evan Abramson. Past Presentation. TRAILER. 23. Minutes. Climate Change; Feminism. United States; Kenya.

A compelling documentary about the collision of climate change, the desperate search for firewood, dirty water, and the burdens placed on women and girls. The film has provoked environmental and green film audiences in Durban, South Africa at the COP-17 meetings, to the Planet in Focus Film Festival in Toronto, where it won "Best International Short." It has also been selected to screen at the Colorado Environmental Film Festival and is being considered to become part of the program at Rio+20 Past Presentation

GoGreenNation News: First-ever water shortage declared on the Colorado River, triggering water cuts for some states in the West
First-ever water shortage declared on the Colorado River, triggering water cuts for some states in the West. Monday, August 16, 2021.

Low water in the Colorado River’s largest reservoir triggered the first-ever federal declaration of a shortage on Monday, a bleak marker of the effects of climate change in the drought-stricken American West and the imperiled future of a critical water source for 40 million people in seven states.

GoGreenNation News: Fish Pay The Price For Failed Water Management
Fish Pay The Price For Failed Water Management. Friday, July 30, 2021.

Two species of the bottom-feeding sucker fish that inhabit the Upper Klamath Lake and nearby rivers are struggling to survive after a century of water management in the Klamath Basin has all but drained the wetlands ecosystem where these fish once thrived.“Historically, these fish were really incredibly abundant — we’re talking tens of millions of individuals,” said Alex Gonyaw, senior fisheries biologist for Klamath Tribes. The tribes once relied heavily on the fish for subsistence and income. Now, the suckers are on the brink of extinction. During the past century, wetlands surrounding Upper Klamath Lake were converted to farmland, while waters from the basin were allocated to irrigators. The lake currently is used to store snowmelt water in the spring and that can be released to farmers during the summer months. But with the wetlands gone, algae in the lake blooms and dies off each year in a cycle that makes the water too toxic for the juvenile fish to survive.

GoGreenNation News: 21st Century Water Management in California
ENVIRONMENTAL NEWS. 21st Century Water Management in California. Monday, October 25, 2021. Water managers are taking extraordinary measures to keep faucets flowing should the state enter a third year of a punishing drought this winter.

Water managers are taking extraordinary measures to keep faucets flowing should the state enter a third year of a punishing drought this winter. That this affluent redwood-studded ecotopia faces such a possibility, though, is a harbinger of a climate-constrained destiny that is fast arriving.“These droughts are now on a new timeline,” said Newsha Ajami, a hydrologist and director of urban water policy at Stanford University’s Water in the West program. “There used to be at least 10 years in between droughts in California, which was time enough for water ecosystems to recover.

GoGreenNation News: Drought-hit California orders Nestlé to stop pumping millions of gallons of water
Drought-hit California orders Nestlé to stop pumping millions of gallons of water. Tuesday, April 27, 2021.

California water officials have moved to stop Nestlé from siphoning millions of gallons of water out of California’s San Bernardino forest, which it bottles and sells as Arrowhead brand water, as drought conditions worsen across the state.

GoGreenNation News: Thousands of Central Valley farmers may lose access to surface water amid worsening drought
Thousands of Central Valley farmers may lose access to surface water amid worsening drought. Friday, July 23, 2021.

As California endures an increasingly brutal second year of drought, state water regulators are considering an emergency order that would bar thousands of Central Valley farmers from using stream and river water to irrigate their crops. On Friday, the State Water Resources Control Board released a draft “emergency curtailment” order for the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta watershed. The measure, which was first reported by the Sacramento Bee, would bar some water rights holders from diverting surface water for agricultural and other purposes. The proposed regulation underscores just how dire matters have become as drought squeezes the American West.“It says that this drought is really severe,” said Erik Ekdahl, deputy director of the state water board’s Division of Water Rights. The water board will consider the order’s approval on Aug. 3. If approved, it would go into effect about two weeks later at the earliest, Ekdahl added.

Cinema Verde Presents: Exploring Glen Springs
Waterways; Activism. USA. Local water activists explore Gainesville’s fresh waterways and how they have been integrated into the city – even crawling beneath behemoth stores to follow the waters. Become a member.

Local water activists explore Gainesville’s fresh waterways and how they have been integrated into the city – even crawling beneath behemoth stores to follow the waters. Past Presentation

Cinema Verde Presents: The Rulindo Challenge
In May 2010, Rulindo, Rwanda launched an ambitious plan to bring access to water and sanitation services to the entire district population.

In May 2010, Rulindo, Rwanda launched an ambitious plan to bring access to water and sanitation services to the entire district population. This film explores the story, challenges and ultimate success for reaching over 330,000 people with safe water in the rural and mountainous Rulindo District, and how this project is inspiring sustainable water (infrastructure and sanitation) models around the world. Coming Soon

Cinema Verde Presents: Bottled Life: The Truth about Neslé's Business with Water
Bottled Life: The Truth about Neslé's Business with Water. Directed By. Urs Schnell. Past Presentation. TRAILER. 90. Minutes. Water Rights. Switzerland.

An exploration of Nestle’s world dominance in the bottled water business, and its exploitations of groundwater and water rights. Swiss journalist Res Gehringer investigates this money making phenomena and reveals the schemes and strategies of the bottled water world. Past Presentation

GoGreenNation News: Going with the Flow: Exploring Loblolly Woods Nature Park
The clear, fast-flowing creek may appear inviting (especially on a hot Florida afternoon), and many visitors may even be tempted to wade in its waters, but looks can be deceiving.

...more pollutants seep into the water as it travels further into the city, and Loblolly Park is a perfect example. Oil from cars, discarded trash, and animal waste from the roads, businesses, and apartments surrounding the park are swept up in the surface runoff. The runoff flows into the creek and contaminates the water.

Cinema Verde Presents: Fish
An elderly couple experiences a crisis with water when the wife tries to change the fishbowl’s water but it slips out of her hand and falls on the ground. Become a member. For full access to our environmental film collection. © 2021 cinema verde.

An elderly couple experiences a crisis with water when the wife tries to change the fishbowl’s water but it slips out of her hand and falls on the ground. Past Presentation

GoGreenNation News: From dust bowl to California drought: a climate scientist on the lessons we still haven’t learned
But we never had a rethink of our system of water rights, and how much of our limited water we should be spending on agriculture versus leaving in the natural ecosystem. Read the full story here. recent ARTICLES. join us. to forge. a sustainable future.

But we never had a rethink of our system of water rights, and how much of our limited water we should be spending on agriculture versus leaving in the natural ecosystem.

GoGreenNation News: Water on Chesapeake Bay military bases contains toxic PFAS ‘forever chemicals’
Water on Chesapeake Bay military bases contains toxic PFAS ‘forever chemicals’. Wednesday, August 11, 2021.

The contamination presents an “extremely troubling” health threat in the nation’s largest estuary, said Scott Faber, EWG’s senior vice president for government affairs.

GoGreenNation News: Will this California drought result in another expansion of water-thirsty orchards?
Will this California drought result in another expansion of water-thirsty orchards? Thursday, September 2, 2021. Will this be the year that California finally reckons with its past and climate changed future?

Will this be the year that California finally reckons with its past and climate changed future? You’d think so, as wildfires threaten Lake Tahoe and reservoirs dry up after two dry winters. Arax is not so sure. ARAX: As an aggregate, agriculture is defying all logic. There’s a kind of delusion that my book speaks to — a kind of a communal madness. Here we are, in the midst of the driest 10-year period in California’s recorded history, and we’re planting ever-more crops and trees on poor ground, which requires deep, deep extraction from the aquifer.

GoGreenNation News: A town's water is contaminated with 'forever chemicals' – how did it get this bad?
A town's water is contaminated with 'forever chemicals' – how did it get this bad? Friday, April 2, 2021.

"Testing by The Guardian and Consumer Reports found high levels of potentially harmful PFAS in Pittsboro, North Carolina, and regulators have struggled to keep pace."

GoGreenNation News: Setting Sail on the Winding Waterways of California’s Delta
Setting Sail on the Winding Waterways of California’s Delta. Sunday, October 3, 2021.

Lauren Sloss describes her experiences sailing throughout California's Delta, one of the state's main water sources.

GoGreenNation News: The US city that proves replacing lead water lines needn’t be a pipe dream
The US city that proves replacing lead water lines needn’t be a pipe dream. Thursday, July 15, 2021. “We know what the issue is, we know what the health effects are, we know how to deal with it,” he added. “It really comes down to political will.".

“We know what the issue is, we know what the health effects are, we know how to deal with it,” he added. “It really comes down to political will."

GoGreenNation News: Thieves in California are stealing scarce water amid extreme drought, 'devastating' some communities
Thieves in California are stealing scarce water amid extreme drought, 'devastating' some communities. Tuesday, July 27, 2021.

As an extreme drought grips California, making water increasingly scarce, thieves are making off with billions of gallons of the precious resource, tapping into fire hydrants, rivers, and even small family homes and farms. State and local officials say water theft is a long running-issue, but the intensifying drought has driven the thefts to record levels as reservoirs dry up and bandits make off with stolen water, often to cultivate the growth of illegal marijuana crops. As officials move to crack down on the thieves, the drought -- which now covers every corner of the state -- threatens to create long-term impacts as climate change exacerbates the hot and dry conditions, creating a vicious feedback loop that becomes harder to break. "All of California has to get used to this concept of water scarcity," West said.

GoGreenNation News: L.A. water recycling imperiled after beach sewage spill, hurting drought conservation
L.A. water recycling imperiled after beach sewage spill, hurting drought conservation. Wednesday, August 11, 2021.

Problems at a Los Angeles sewage treatment plant that caused a massive spill into Santa Monica Bay last month have severely reduced the region’s water recycling ability, forcing officials to divert millions of gallons of clean drinking water at a time of worsening drought conditions, The Times has learned. Even as California Gov. Gavin Newsom urges a voluntary 15% reduction in water usage, the Hyperion Water Reclamation Plant‘s inability to fully treat sewage has forced local officials to divert drinking water to uses normally served by recycled water. Among those is an effort to protect coastal aquifers from seawater contamination, as well as the irrigation of parks, cemeteries and golf courses across southwest Los Angeles County.

GoGreenNation News: Judge OKs $626 Million Settlement In Flint Water Litigation
Judge OKs $626 Million Settlement In Flint Water Litigation. Wednesday, November 10, 2021. Flint managers appointed by then-Gov.

Flint managers appointed by then-Gov. Rick Snyder and regulators in his administration allowed the city to use the Flint River in 2014-15 without treating the water to reduce corrosion. As a result, lead in old pipes broke off and flowed.

GoGreenNation News: More than 25m drink from the worst US water systems, with Latinos most exposed
More than 25m drink from the worst US water systems, with Latinos most exposed. Friday, February 26, 2021.

Millions of people in the US are drinking water that fails to meet federal health standards, including by violating limits for dangerous contaminants. Latinos are disproportionately exposed, according to the Guardian’s review of more than 140,000 public water systems across the US and county-level demographic data.

GoGreenNation News: In a First, U.S. Declares Shortage on Colorado River, Forcing Water Cuts
Declares Shortage on Colorado River, Forcing Water Cuts. Monday, August 16, 2021.

With climate change and long-term drought continuing to take a toll on the Colorado River, the federal government on Monday for the first time declared a water shortage at Lake Mead, one of the river’s main reservoirs. The declaration triggers cuts in water supply that, for now, mostly will affect Arizona farmers. Beginning next year they will be cut off from much of the water they have relied on for decades. Much smaller reductions are mandated for Nevada and for Mexico across the southern border. But larger cuts, affecting far more of the 40 million people in the West who rely on the river for at least part of their water supply, are likely in coming years as a warming climate continues to reduce how much water flows into the Colorado from rain and melting snow.

GoGreenNation News: Pump Suwannee River water to replenish aquifer? 'Ridiculous,' critics charge
Pump Suwannee River water to replenish aquifer? 'Ridiculous,' critics charge. Friday, June 18, 2021. Smart said money would be better spent buying land and conservation easements from farmers to reduce water usage and reduce nutrients from fertilizer.

Smart said money would be better spent buying land and conservation easements from farmers to reduce water usage and reduce nutrients from fertilizer. “Whenever we try to re-engineer natural systems instead of just protecting them it is way more expensive and it typically doesn’t work,” Smart said. “They are looking for an incredibly complex engineering answer to a very simple environmental question. It seems like there’s got to be a better use of time for the district than dreaming up pipe dreams.” This is a ridiculous idea - it would pollute the purest remaining water source we have!-tr*

GoGreenNation News: Wildfires Threaten Urban Water Supplies, Long After the Flames Are Out
Wildfires Threaten Urban Water Supplies, Long After the Flames Are Out. Thursday, June 24, 2021. About two-thirds of drinking water in the United States originates in forests.

About two-thirds of drinking water in the United States originates in forests. And when wildfires affect watersheds, cities can face a different kind of impact, long after the flames are out.

GoGreenNation News: ‘The water is coming’: Florida Keys faces stark reality as seas rise
‘The water is coming’: Florida Keys faces stark reality as seas rise. Thursday, June 24, 2021.

Once people are unable to secure mortgages and insurance for soaked homes, the Keys will cease to be a livable place long before it’s fully underwater, according to Harold Wanless, a geographer at the University of Miami. “People don’t have a concept of what sea level rise will do to them. They just can’t conceive it,” he said.

GoGreenNation News: Newsom asks all Californians to voluntarily reduce water usage by 15% amid drought
Newsom asks all Californians to voluntarily reduce water usage by 15% amid drought. Thursday, July 8, 2021. Gov.

Gov. Gavin Newsom is asking Californians to voluntarily cut back on water consumption by 15% compared with last year as drought conditions worsen and temperatures continue to rise across the western United States. The governor on Thursday also expanded his regional drought state of emergency to apply to 50 California counties, or roughly 42% of the state’s population. If achieved, a voluntary 15% water reduction statewide would save roughly 850,000 acre-feet of water, which is enough to supply 1.7 million households for a year, according to the governor’s office.

GoGreenNation News: San Diego launching Pure Water, largest infrastructure project in city’s history
San Diego launching Pure Water, largest infrastructure project in city’s history. Friday, August 20, 2021.

San Diego formally launched Friday the largest infrastructure project in city history, a sewage recycling system that will boost local water independence in the face of more severe droughts caused by climate change. Dubbed “Pure Water,” the multibillion-dollar project is the culmination of a lengthy process featuring thorny lawsuits, complex labor deals and an aggressive public education campaign to fight the derogatory early nickname “toilet to tap.” “Pure Water is a legacy project that promises to deliver a reliable source of clean water to our region for decades to come — that’s why I advocated for $50 million in this year’s state budget,” state Senator Toni Atkins said at Gloria’s Friday news conference. “With worsening drought conditions in our state, this project is needed now more than ever.”

Cinema Verde Presents: L’eau Est La Vie (Water Is Life): From Standing Rock To The Swamp
L’eau Est La Vie (Water Is Life): From Standing Rock To The Swamp. Directed By. Sam Vinal. Now Playing. TRAILER. L'eau Est La Vie (Water Is Life): From Standing Rock to the Swamp (United States, 25 min). Directed by Sam Vinal.

L'eau Est La Vie (Water Is Life): From Standing Rock to the Swamp (United States, 25 min). Directed by Sam Vinal. On the banks of Louisiana, fierce Indigenous women are ready to fight—to stop the corporate blacksnake and preserve their way of life. They are risking everything to protect Mother Earth from the predatory fossil fuel companies that seek to poison it. The film follows water protector Cherri Foytlin in the swamps of Louisiana as she leads us on a no-nonsense journey of indigenous resistance to the Bayou Bridge Pipeline (BBP), which is an extension of the Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL). The pipelines are part of an ongoing legacy of colonization and slow genocide. At the heart of the struggle is a battle between people and profit. Now Playing

GoGreenNation News: The US military is polluting Hawaii’s water supply – and denying it
The US military is polluting Hawaii’s water supply – and denying it. Tuesday, January 4, 2022. Its construction began before the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor.

Its construction began before the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor. Since then, it has leaked over 180,000 gallons of petroleum into the groundwater aquifer that provides drinking water for over 400,000 residents and visitors from Hālawa to Hawaiʻi Kai.Despite its longstanding threat to water systems, this decrepit facility has been in use until operations were “paused” in late November, after hundreds of military families reported rashes, headaches, nausea, vomiting – symptoms of petroleum poisoning.

Cinema Verde Presents: Vanishing Springs
This pure, crystal clear water is the life blood of our state and without it, life as we know it in the sunshine state would not exist.

The Florida you know is a lie. In contrast to what Americans have been told, Florida’s magic is not found in the giant mouse, the rolling green golf courses, or in the beachside palaces. The beauty and uniqueness of Florida is under our feet - the aquifer. This pure, crystal clear water is the life blood of our state and without it, life as we know it in the sunshine state would not exist. This life sustaining force is only seen where it bubbles up to the surface through Florida’s collection of 1,000 springs. These springs were originally what drew society to this land. Wealthy tourists in the 1900’s flooded the Florida springs seeking medicinal cures from its pristine waters. As springs became a popular tourist destination, spring houses were built around these pools of water. When this development began, the springs began flowing less and some eventually stopped altogether. People assumed this was the natural order of this wonder and moved on. Theme parks, golf courses and resorts were erected to entice tourists to visit Florida, the natural beauty of the state soon faded out of our memory. The springs of Florida now silently suffer from the effects of continued development in Florida. The current strain we are placing on the fragile ecosystem is choking the life out of our state. Overdevelopment is one of the leading forces that is damaging the springs. The once pure sources of water no longer boil up like a fountain the way they have for centuries. The water that the springs do produce is polluted by nitrates. This pollution fuels the growth of toxic algae blooms, which are taking over springs and the rivers they feed, thus putting our health at risk. Over 90% of our drinking water gushes out of these sapphire pools. These glorious reservoirs have begun to shrink. If something is not done soon, the springs will simply become part of Florida history. In southern Florida they already have. Springs once bubbled up all across the state. They were wiped out in South Florida decades ago by the ditching and draining of the landscape as well as over-pumping of the aquifer. This water was then sprayed on suburban lawns and farmers' fields, run through showers and flushed down toilets, turned into steam to crank turbines for electricity, or siphoned into plastic bottles for sale around the country. Because of poor use and neglect of our greatest resource, we will soon be without this supply of fresh water. Floridians regard their water supply as abundant and cheap, when the fact is it's neither. Until this attitude changes, the springs will not be rescued. Coming Soon

Cinema Verde Presents: Thirst for Power
Filmed across France, California, and Texas, the film traces the history of civilization's quest to procure abundant water and energy — from ancient Roman aqueducts in Europe to modern America’s vast hydroelectric infrastructure.

Filmed across France, California, and Texas, the film traces the history of civilization's quest to procure abundant water and energy — from ancient Roman aqueducts in Europe to modern America’s vast hydroelectric infrastructure. In the modern world, water and energy are the two fundamental components of a society, and they are interconnected. The film explores our dependence on water for energy as well as the huge vulnerabilities in our current systems, exacerbated by climate change. The documentary is adapted from Dr. Michael E. Webber’s book Thirst for Power: Energy, Water, and Human Survival. Past Presentation

GoGreenNation News: Desalination advances in California despite opponents pushing for alternatives
After spending 22 years and $100 million navigating a thicket of state regulations and environmentalists' challenges, Poseidon Water is down to one major regulatory hurdle - the California Coastal Commission.

After spending 22 years and $100 million navigating a thicket of state regulations and environmentalists' challenges, Poseidon Water is down to one major regulatory hurdle - the California Coastal Commission. The company feels confident enough to talk of breaking ground by the end of next year on the $1.4 billion plant that would produce some 50 million gallons of drinking water daily. Andrea Leon-Grossmann, director of climate action for the ocean conservation group Azul, says better alternatives include conservation, repairing leaky pipes, capturing storm water runoff and committing to more recycled water.

GoGreenNation News: A problem Silicon Valley can’t solve: Drought, quake risk
Estremera said the district is investing heavily in water recycling and conservation, as well as planning new reservoirs — such as the potential $2.5-billion Pacheco Reservoir, which would hold 140,000 acre-feet of water, surpassing by half the volume of Anderson

Estremera said the district is investing heavily in water recycling and conservation, as well as planning new reservoirs — such as the potential $2.5-billion Pacheco Reservoir, which would hold 140,000 acre-feet of water, surpassing by half the volume of Anderson Reservoir. While San Jose Mayor Sam Liccardo announced his opposition to the reservoir, saying it was too expensive, Estremera said the region needs every option. “You can’t create more water,” he said. “You need to conserve, preserve and recycle.”

GoGreenNation News: A 20-Foot Sea Wall? Miami Faces the Hard Choices of Climate Change.
"It is my sense that most Floridians would live with the risk of water to preserve their lifestyle,” said Cynthia Barnett, a Gainesville-based environmental journalist who has published books about rain and the fate of the oceans.

“It is my sense that most Floridians would live with the risk of water to preserve their lifestyle,” said Cynthia Barnett, a Gainesville-based environmental journalist who has published books about rain and the fate of the oceans. “This idea of working with water rather than always fighting against it is really the lesson of Florida history. If Florida history has taught us one thing, it’s that hardscaping this water that defines us will bring hardships to future generations.”

Cinema Verde Presents: One Day We Will Dance With You
One Day We Will Dance with You tells the story of two women creating a dance to celebrate water. They imagine dance moves, and argue about science and whether a celebration can still be sad.

One Day We Will Dance with You tells the story of two women creating a dance to celebrate water. They imagine dance moves, and argue about science and whether a celebration can still be sad. As the community around them comes together to dance, they begin to imagine a future where the Water Molecule Dance and the celebration of water becomes a part of all our lives. Coming Soon

Cinema Verde Presents: Follow the Plastic
It's the opposite of a miracle, turning our precious water into plastic waste, and then the waste makes its way back into our waters. Now is up to us to save our Florida springs! Become a member.

It's the opposite of a miracle, turning our precious water into plastic waste, and then the waste makes its way back into our waters. Now is up to us to save our Florida springs! Coming Soon

GoGreenNation News: Dramatic photos from NASA highlight severity of California’s drought
Some said they probably represent a new normal for a Golden State gone brown.The lake’s water level probably will keep dwindling, said John Yarbrough, the Department of Water Resources’ assistant deputy director of the State Water Project.Yarbrough said California

The satellite images are stark, and their ramifications run deep, experts said — from dead lawns and fallow fields to ecological peril and worsening wildfires. Some said they probably represent a new normal for a Golden State gone brown.The lake’s water level probably will keep dwindling, said John Yarbrough, the Department of Water Resources’ assistant deputy director of the State Water Project.Yarbrough said California typically receives the majority of its annual precipitation between early December and the end of March, so the situation is unlikely to improve for several months, if not longer.“This lack of stored water as a result of the West-wide drought has multiple cascading impacts,” he said, “including dramatically less water for our farms and communities, more stress on our electricity grid and increased wildfire risk.”

GoGreenNation News: A Drought So Dire That a Utah Town Pulled the Plug on Growth
But those newcomers need waterwater that is vanishing as a megadrought dries up reservoirs and rivers across the West.

During the coronavirus pandemic, the real estate market in their 1,750-person city boomed as remote workers flocked in from the West Coast and second homeowners staked weekend ranches. But those newcomers need water — water that is vanishing as a megadrought dries up reservoirs and rivers across the West. So this spring, Oakley, about an hour’s drive east of Salt Lake City, imposed a construction moratorium on new homes that would connect to the town’s water system. It is one of the first towns in the United States to purposely stall growth for want of water in a new era of megadroughts. But it could be a harbinger of things to come in a hotter, drier West.“These towns are canaries in the coal mine,” said Paul D. Brooks, a professor of hydrology at the University of Utah. “They can’t count to go to the tap and turn on the water. Climate change is coming home to roost right now, and it’s hitting us hard.”

GoGreenNation News: Climate Change In California Is Threatening The World's Top Almond Producer
More growers are expected to abandon their orchards as water becomes scarce and expensive. Almonds are California's top agricultural export.

A historic drought across the U.S. West is taking a heavy toll on California's $6 billion almond industry, which produces roughly 80% of the world's almonds. More growers are expected to abandon their orchards as water becomes scarce and expensive. Almonds are California's top agricultural export. The industry ships about 70% of its almonds overseas, fueled by strong demand in India, East Asia and Europe, according to the board. "All of this increase in almonds and this increase in water demand, it's been done at a time when there's virtually no increase in water supply," said David Goldhamer, a water management specialist at the University of California, Davis. "The water embodied in the production of those almonds is being exported out of this country."

GoGreenNation News: Going with the Flow: Exploring Hogtown Creek Headwaters Nature Park
A web of small streams of water flow along the trail, and although they are small trickles of water in this early stage of the journey, they will eventually merge with other bodies of water downstream to form Hogtown Creek.

The streams near the trail pass through wetlands, which play a vital role in filtering out pollution from the water. Despite the sanitary start, the creek collects pollutants as it leaves the wetlands and flows further into the city. Runoff carrying chemicals, animal waste, and even trash seep into the creek as it travels, and these pollutants eventually end up in the aquifer, which Gainesville relies on for its drinking water.

Cinema Verde Presents: The Great Divide
Yolanda must wash the tomatoes for the salsa first in the sink and then again with a splash of clean water from a 5-gallon jug. The process is arduous, and though she’s resigned to do it, she’s not happy about it.

Twenty minutes outside of Visalia, amidst the seemingly endless rows of citrus trees, Yolanda Cuevas packs enchiladas with shredded chicken for her husband Benjamin, their adult daughters and two teenaged grandchildren in her modest single-story home. Their house is the first one off the main drag, one of 83 lining the two crumbling roads that comprise the tiny town of Tooleville. Yolanda must wash the tomatoes for the salsa first in the sink and then again with a splash of clean water from a 5-gallon jug. The process is arduous, and though she’s resigned to do it, she’s not happy about it. Along with Tooleville’s several hundred other residents, Yolanda’s family has survived on bi-weekly delivery of water to their homes for the past12 years. It’s an annoyance for the family, and it’s expensive for the State of California, which has been paying for the replacement water since the discovery of Chromium-6 (the same chemical featured in Erin Brokovich) in the water. The simpler solution would be to consolidate the town’s water system with that of its larger, affluent neighbor to the west, Exeter. And for this purpose, Yolanda has become a reluctant activist, attending community meetings in Tooleville and lobbying for consolidation at Exeter’s city council meetings under the expert guidance of Pedro Hernandez, an organizer with the Leadership Counsel. While Exeter has resisted the consolidation since it was first proposed, organizers like Pedro feel that this could be the year Exeter finally succumbs to the growing community pressure and brings Tooleville into the fold. The decision will echo around the Central Valley and across the state, as hundreds of similar community water systems find themselves in a nearly identical predicament. Now Playing

Cinema Verde Presents: The Global Connection: Saving Florida's Springs
Water. United States. If we observe and listen closely, our world communicates to us.

If we observe and listen closely, our world communicates to us. The director with producer Tessa Skiles, travelling the Springs Heartland for a year, explored the hidden gems of Florida and consulted with leading experts on the current state of Florida's water resources. From springs hunting to mystical mermaids to interviews with National Geographic explorers, this film educates us on the threats facing the water Floridians consume every day and how Florida springs are a looking glass into the health of our most vital natural resource. Past Presentation

Cinema Verde Presents: Hidden Secrets of Florida Springs
Water. United States. Florida has over 1,000 freshwater springs, more than anywhere else in the world. Not only do these springs nurture a wonderland of plants and wildlife, they flow from an aquifer that provides drinking water for 90% of Floridians.

Florida has over 1,000 freshwater springs, more than anywhere else in the world. Not only do these springs nurture a wonderland of plants and wildlife, they flow from an aquifer that provides drinking water for 90% of Floridians. Their value for recreation, real estate, and potable water is measured in billions of dollars. Rare footage illustrates the springs’ beauty but also reveals that humans may have done more damage to them in the last 50 years than in the last 10,000 years. Past Presentation

GoGreenNation News: Despite Newsom’s call to cut water use, L.A. and San Diego didn’t conserve in July
Despite Newsom’s call to cut water use, L.A. and San Diego didn’t conserve in July. Tuesday, September 21, 2021. Despite an appeal by Gov.

Despite an appeal by Gov. Gavin Newsom for all Californians to voluntarily cut water use by 15%, Southern California has lagged in conservation efforts and even increased water consumption slightly in Los Angeles and San Diego, according to newly released data.

GoGreenNation News: Greenland: enough ice melted on single day to cover Florida in two inches of water
Greenland: enough ice melted on single day to cover Florida in two inches of water. Friday, July 30, 2021.

The scale of disappearing ice is so large that the losses on Tuesday alone created enough meltwater to drownthe entire US state of Florida in two inches, or 5cm, of water. Ice that melts away in Greenland flows as water into the ocean, where it adds to the ongoing increase in global sea level caused by human-induced climate change.

GoGreenNation News: Drought-Stricken Nevada Enacts Ban On ‘Non-Functional’ Grass
By ripping it out, water officials estimate the region can conserve 10% of its total available Colorado River water supply and save about 11 gallons (41 liters) per person per day in a region with a population of about 2.3 million.

The measure will require the replacement of about 6 square miles (16 square kilometers) of grass in the metro Las Vegas area. By ripping it out, water officials estimate the region can conserve 10% of its total available Colorado River water supply and save about 11 gallons (41 liters) per person per day in a region with a population of about 2.3 million.

GoGreenNation News: Warming rivers in US West killing fish, imperiling industry
Hundreds of thousands of young salmon are dying in Northern California’s Klamath River as low water levels brought about by drought allow a parasite to thrive, devastating a Native American tribe whose diet and traditions are tied to the fish.

Hundreds of thousands of young salmon are dying in Northern California’s Klamath River as low water levels brought about by drought allow a parasite to thrive, devastating a Native American tribe whose diet and traditions are tied to the fish. And wildlife officials said the Sacramento River is facing a “near-complete loss” of young Chinook salmon due to abnormally warm water.

GoGreenNation News: End of the avocado: why chefs are ditching the unsustainable fruit
Problems including deforestation, loss of biodiversity, and water shortages mean that “the communities growing them do not have enough water for washing and hygiene”, adds Lang.

Avocados have become a “global commodity crop”, he says, the perfect example of what happens when “an exotic food becomes normalised with no thinking through of the consequences”. Problems including deforestation, loss of biodiversity, and water shortages mean that “the communities growing them do not have enough water for washing and hygiene”, adds Lang.

Cinema Verde Presents: Daaham Thirst
Water Award Directed by Siva Nageswara Rao – Water is a precious resource which humanity should use responsibly. Our relationship with Nature should always be guided by reciprocity.

Thirst – Daaham (India-subtitled, 4 min). Water Award Directed by Siva Nageswara Rao – Water is a precious resource which humanity should use responsibly. Our relationship with Nature should always be guided by reciprocity. Nature protects us all and we in turn should protect natural resources and be sympathetic to the needs of fellow human beings. Now Playing

GoGreenNation News: Why New York Is Unearthing a Brook It Buried a Century Ago
New York is a city surrounded by water, from the open ocean to bays to rivers.

New York is a city surrounded by water, from the open ocean to bays to rivers. But there is also an enormous trove of water hidden below its streets and high-rise buildings — hundreds of subterranean streams, creeks and springs that were buried long ago and all but forgotten as the city grew.

Cinema Verde Presents: Waters of the U.S.
Waters of the U.S. Directed By. Kelly Marshall. Now Playing. TRAILER. Waters of the U.S. (United States, 21 min). Directed by Remi Escudié.

Waters of the U.S. (United States, 21 min). Directed by Remi Escudié. The current administration is rolling back crucial protections for streams and wetlands across the country in a direct assault on the Clean Water Act. This incredibly beautiful film tells the story of the rivers, streams, and wetlands of Alabama to illustrate the dangers of the proposed regulation. By doing so, it shows the economic benefits, ecological health, and cultural way of life that hang in the balance. The director hails from Miami, Florida, with a strong passion for environmental advocacy. With a degree in Editing, Writing & Media from Florida State University and a background in environmental journalism, he intends to make documentaries to inspire protection wildlife and our natural resources. Now Playing

Cinema Verde Presents: The Everglades: A Watery Wilderness
The Everglades: A Watery Wilderness. Directed By. Zoltan Török. Past Presentation. 52. Minutes. Water. Germany. Forget that dark swamp picture, the Everglades in fact is a crystal clear, shallow river flowing slowly towards the sea.

Forget that dark swamp picture, the Everglades in fact is a crystal clear, shallow river flowing slowly towards the sea. This is an intimate portrait of this strange but troubled watery wilderness through the stories of the animals that call it home, for example, “a little grey bird that was walking silently under the bushes… and then all of a sudden he picked up a land crab! A big one. . . . I didn’t guess that we’re going to end up spending more than a week on that little meadow in the mangrove.” Past Presentation

GoGreenNation News: It's December and it hasn't snowed in Denver yet. That's never been recorded
This extended dry period has implications for the state's long-standing drought, a dwindling water supply and a population that wants to hit the slopes. Read the full story here. recent ARTICLES. join us. to forge. a sustainable future.

This extended dry period has implications for the state's long-standing drought, a dwindling water supply and a population that wants to hit the slopes.

Cinema Verde Presents: Crisis
The state of water in the world is critical, but the relationship between a man and a fish that are in story is more critical. Become a member. For full access to our environmental film collection. © 2021 cinema verde. PO Box 358711.

The state of water in the world is critical, but the relationship between a man and a fish that are in story is more critical. Coming Soon

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