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GoGreenNation News: Petrochemical exposure linked to health risks
GoGreenNation News: Petrochemical exposure linked to health risks

A recent review highlights the harmful impact of petrochemicals on health, with evidence pointing to an increase in chronic diseases.Liza Gross reports for Inside Climate News.In short:Petrochemical production has surged since the 1950s, correlating with a rise in chronic and deadly diseases.The review calls for reduced reliance on fossil fuels, not only for environmental reasons but also to improve health outcomes, particularly for vulnerable communities.Regulatory oversight is lacking, with many chemicals entering the market without adequate safety testing, highlighting a need for systemic change.Key quote:"You can feel the effects of climate change, and know they're connected to fossil fuels. But the idea that fossil fuels are also connected to these chemicals we're exposed to, and are impacting our health, I thought, wow, there's a really important link here."— Tracey Woodruff, director of the program on reproductive health and the environment at the University of California, San FranciscoWhy this matters:Petrochemical facilities emit a variety of pollutants, including volatile organic compounds (VOCs), sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, and particulate matter, which can contribute to respiratory problems, cardiovascular disease, and cancer among nearby populations. Communities living in close proximity to these plants often report higher rates of these health issues compared to those living farther away.Studies show that the nearly 69,800 residents of Texas towns Cloverleaf and Channelview — more than a third of them children under 18 — are breathing some of the dirtiest air in the country.

GoGreenNation News: Exploring the health risks of living near LNG facilities
GoGreenNation News: Exploring the health risks of living near LNG facilities

Scientists in British Columbia are investigating the health implications for residents living in proximity to liquefied natural gas export facilities, focusing on pollution from flaring, the combustion process of methane gas. Michelle Gamage reports for The Tyee.In short:Researchers in British Columbia begin a project to re-evaluate health impacts from LNG facility pollution, notably from flaring processes that burn methane gas.The study scrutinizes previously underestimated flaring levels and aims to quantify additional air pollution exposure for nearby residents.A collaborative effort involving universities and environmental organizations, this research will utilize satellite imaging and health impact assessments over two years.Key quote: "We're scared those facilities like Kitimat and Woodfibre will flare more than what they said they would do." — Laura Minet, lead researcher of the study and leader of the Clean Air Lab at the University of VictoriaWhy this matters: Evidence suggests living in proximity to LNG facilities where flaring is a common practice can significantly impact the health of nearby residents and the surrounding environment. Exposure to pollutants from flaring can lead to increased health risks, particularly for vulnerable populations such as children, the elderly, and those with preexisting health conditions. In the U.S., LNG production comes at a steep price for those living along the Gulf Coast.

GoGreenNation News: Industrial plant emissions linked to health hazards, study reveals
GoGreenNation News: Industrial plant emissions linked to health hazards, study reveals

A recent study highlights the severe health and economic impacts of flaring and venting at industrial plants, including premature deaths and exacerbated asthma cases.Victoria St. Martin reports for Inside Climate News.In short:Flaring and venting activities at industrial plants are causing significant health issues, including asthma exacerbations in children and about 710 premature deaths annually.The study, involving researchers from Boston University and others, found that these practices cost the U.S. approximately $7.4 billion each year in health damages.Texas, Pennsylvania, and Colorado are the top states affected by these emissions, impacting nearly half a million Americans living close to oil and gas facilities.Key quote:“We know that PM 2.5 is bad for health, we know that ozone is bad for health, but to see the amount of asthma exacerbations that were attributed to nitrogen dioxide, I think that was surprising to us.”— Erin Polka, a doctoral student in the Department of Environmental Health at Boston University’s School of Public HealthWhy this matters:Industrial plant emissions are a significant concern for both environmental health and public well-being, contributing to a range of issues that affect ecosystems, air quality, and human health. In 2020, researchers linked air pollution from burning off excess natural gas to preterm births for babies, with the most pronounced impacts among Hispanic families.

GoGreenNation News: From poisoning to skin diseases: multiple effects of sargassum on health
GoGreenNation News: From poisoning to skin diseases: multiple effects of sargassum on health

This is a republishing collaboration with Centro de Periodismo Investigativo, where this originally published. See the full series, Caribbean People at Risk from Sargassum Invasion.In the quiet seaside village of Capesterre on Marie-Galante island in Guadeloupe on April 18, 2023, the air-quality monitoring institute Gwad’Air issued a “red alert” to warn people away from coastal areas.The culprit was sargassum. After washing ashore for days, the floating seaweed was emitting a dangerous level of hydrogen sulfide gas as it rotted on the beach. To read a version of this story in Spanish click here. Haz clic aquí para leer este reportaje en español.The problem was not new for residents of Marie-Galante, a sleepy agricultural island of 11,000 inhabitants that is part of Guadeloupe’s biosphere reserve.Since the first mass strandings more than ten years ago, rotting sargassum has frequently plagued residents and tourists and forced several businesses and restaurants to close their doors for months at a time.Among the struggling proprietors are sisters Marie-Louise and Lyselène Bade, who recently shuttered their small hotel Le Soleil Levant. Though they still operate a bakery and grocery store they inherited from their mother, Marie-Louise said a Gwad’Air technician recently asked her a worrying question: “How do you manage to stay here?” She often wonders the same thing. “You know, I love wearing costume jewelry, but now I can’t keep it on my skin for more than a quarter of an hour. They oxidize and make my skin itch. When you see what it does to electrical equipment and metal, you wonder what it does inside your body, to your lungs,” she said. Thanks to recent research carried out in the French Caribbean — much of which has struggled with similar problems as Marie-Galante — scientists can now better answer that question. They paint a bleak picture. Their studies suggest that the hydrogen sulfide and ammonia gasses released by rotting sargassum can endanger pregnant women, exacerbate respiratory issues like asthma, and cause headaches and memory loss, among other serious health problems. But this knowledge has not been enough to protect Bade and many other Guadeloupe residents. Even as the French Caribbean has emerged as a regional leader in the fight against sargassum, researchers such as Martinique-based doctor Dabor Resiere have said response efforts there have fallen far short. As a result, many residents regularly face dangerous health risks — and the French government has turned to the world stage to call for an international response to address sargassum as a global problem.‘Airborne poisoning outbreak’By the time 2018 brought a record sargassum influx to Caribbean shorelines, the health effects of the rotting seaweed had become much better known. In December of that year, a group of sargassum researchers in Martinique issued a stark warning. In a letter published in The Lancet medical journal, they noted that doctors in Martinique and Guadeloupe — French islands with a combined population of nearly 800,000 — had recently recorded more than 11,000 cases of acute sargassum toxicity during an eight-month period. Among them were three cases admitted to intensive care. “To mitigate this emerging airborne poisoning outbreak, the French government has already promised €10 million [US $10,835,600] to supply equipment that can be used to remove the seaweed within 48 hours, to monitor hydrogen sulfide concentrations on the affected shores, to train doctors, and to assign experts in toxicology in affected areas,” wrote Resiere and 10 other researchers based in Martinique and France. “Despite this commendable first effort by the French government, a mitigation plan to address this enigmatic sargassum invasion should urgently be discussed at an international level to boost marine research, pool resources, and consolidate local political priorities,” Resiere said. The French government — which for decades has struggled with algae washing ashore on its European coasts — has launched two national sargassum plans funded with about $26 million for 2018-2022 and about $40 million for 2022-2026. Millions more were spent by local authorities in sargassum collection operations and investment in dedicated equipment. “You know, I love wearing costume jewelry, but now I can’t keep it on my skin for more than a quarter of an hour. They oxidize and make my skin itch." - Marie-Louise Bade, owner of the small hotel Le Soleil LevantAs a result, the French islands of Guadeloupe, Martinique, Saint Martin and Saint Barthelemy have launched some of the most extensive response efforts in the Caribbean in recent years. Besides the ongoing research, these efforts have included air-quality-monitoring programs, clean-up initiatives, and one of the rare national response strategies that has been officially adopted by the government. In 2019, Guadeloupe also hosted the first International Sargassum Conference, where the Guadeloupe Region — in partnership with the French government, the French National Research Agency and two Brazilian agencies — launched a call for projects with financial support from the European Union and other sources. This effort ultimately funded 12 projects — the results of which were presented on Feb. 28, 2024 — as part of the National Sargassum Prevention and Control Plan. Besides probing the algae cycle and the environmental effects of sargassum, these projects have also investigated health impacts. One of the outcomes, the SargaCare project, led to a July 2022 study on more than 3,000 pregnant women on Martinique, which reported finding evidence of a higher risk of potentially fatal preeclampsia in expectant mothers exposed to sargassum fumes. A later SargaCare study suggested that prolonged exposure to the fumes increases the risk of patients developing sleep apnea.‘The situation remained unchanged’But despite this work, health researchers have warned that response efforts have not kept pace with the problem in the French Caribbean or the wider region. More than four years after their 2018 warning in The Lancet, Dr. Resiere and seven colleagues upped the ante in a March 2023 letter published in the Journal of Global Health. In Guadeloupe and Martinique, they wrote, “the situation remained unchanged. Despite the French government’s plans to tackle the sargassum problem, these toxic algae are continuing to inundate the coasts of Martinique, Guadeloupe, and French Guiana in ever-greater volumes.” The Covid-19 pandemic, they stated, was partially to blame for the problem because it had sucked up health resources. But they also noted the absence of a coordinated regional health response and warned that Caribbean governments eager to jumpstart their post-pandemic tourism economies may be inclined to downplay the sargassum problem. “The public continues to be adversely affected, some have sold their dream houses which are becoming unlivable, some have abandoned their schools and workplaces for lack of a solution to this scourge,” the researchers wrote. “It is urgent to come to the aid of these families who, in addition to the health consequences due to the significant emanations of hydrogen sulfide, have to bear the material consequences, being often forced to replace all their household appliances or the metal parts of their houses.”2023 seasonBy the time the researchers’ letter was published in March 2023, a new sargassum season was already causing health problems across the French Caribbean. In late January 2023, a 59-year-old woman was treated by emergency services for acute toxicity after taking part in a sargassum clean-up on Tartane beach in Trinité, Martinique. On March 2, the Martinique municipality of Le Robert partially closed the Four à Chaux school due to high exposure to gas released by sargassum.And when the air pollution alert was triggered in Guadeloupe’s Saint-François lagoon area on Sept. 15, people were asked to move away from a populated marina area that hosts hotels, restaurants and tourism businesses offering water activities.Marie-GalanteBack in Marie-Galante, Marie-Louise Bade continued to struggle as well. Bade, who goes by “Malou,” operates multiple businesses on her island, where the economy is powered by tourism, fishing, sugarcane and banana crops, and a rum distillery. “For 11 years, I’ve had to put up with this,” Bade said. “For 11 years, every time I open my doors, I think, ‘My God, what other appliance is going to break down this morning?’ No matter how much we repair, clean, the walls turn gray. Algae eats away at all the plumbing. … So everything is destroyed and there are leaks all the time.” Tourists, she said, stopped coming. “I can’t rent out the rooms anymore,” she said. “People open the windows, they have a view of the sargassum. There’s the smell. And on the walls, the pipes, the air-conditioning: Everything turns black.”Her health has suffered as well. Bade described continuous itching, small pimples appearing on her skin, vision issues, and respiratory problems that now force her to take asthma medication. Various governmental efforts have not provided relief in her day-to-day life, she said. About two years ago, for example, the Guadeloupe regional health agency distributed questionnaires for about a month. But since then, she said, no follow-up action has been taken to her knowledge. The businesswoman said the town doctor regularly monitors the effects of sargassum on the population’s health, and he encourages her to consult him every three months. Last year, residents got a brief respite when booms were installed offshore in August in hopes of preventing the seaweed from reaching the beach. For a while, the solution worked, according to the town’s mayor, Jean-Claude Maes. Residents started walking along the coast again as they hadn’t done for years, and a few entrepreneurs decided to set up new businesses, Maes said. But the respite was short-lived: The booms were swept away last October by swells caused by Hurricane Tammy. Plans to reinstall them by December still have not come to fruition. Though such responsibilities normally fall to towns and cities, the French government has decided to bear 80% of the financial cost of combating sargassum. But the mayor said that funding was slow in coming last year. ‘Irritation and anxiety’While residents suffer, research continues. Professor Dabor Resiere, a sargassum researcher and department head at Martinique University Hospital, said previous studies have focused largely on the effects of acute toxicity caused by high levels of sargassum gasses. But there is a dearth of information on chronic toxicity at lower doses, he said. To learn more, the professor and his team have been visiting patients in the field as part of a Martinique University Hospital monitoring program they plan to export soon to Guadeloupe, St. Lucia and other islands. “We don’t know about the average resident who lives near a stranding site, who receives a small amount of [exposure to sargassum gas] every day,” said Resiere. “We can see that the majority of these patients continue to have trouble sleeping, continue to have generalized fatigue, continue to have conjunctivitis, irritation and anxiety. This anxiety, this depressive syndrome: All these symptoms we observe in patients. But now we need to demonstrate it scientifically.” Other research is continuing as well. After the results of the 2019 call for projects were presented this February, the Guadeloupe Region and its partners launched a new call for projects. This round will continue studying health impacts, as well as addressing other topics including sargassum’s effects on marine ecosystems and the hydrodynamic conditions that affect blooms. But in Marie-Galante, Bade and her sister have more immediate concerns. Currently, the metal roof of their businesses leaks because of holes they blame on corrosion caused by the sargassum gasses. But they are reluctant to invest in repairs as long as they are faced with continued uncertainty. Despite the risks, they have no plans to leave. For Bade, it is inconceivable to close the business bequeathed to her by her mother, in which she and her sister grew up. “What would the town be without a bakery?” she asked. This investigation is the result of a fellowship awarded by the Center for Investigative Journalism’s Training Institute and was made possible in part with the support of Open Society Foundations.

GoGreenNation News: Unsafe drinking water in U.S. prisons poses health risks, study finds
GoGreenNation News: Unsafe drinking water in U.S. prisons poses health risks, study finds

Nearly half of U.S. prisons may be exposed to harmful "forever chemicals" in their water supply, raising concerns over health inequities and human rights within the justice system.Sharon Udasin reports for The Hill.In short:A study found that 47% of prison facilities are potentially affected by PFAS pollution, impacting roughly 990,000 people, including juveniles.Researchers stress the vulnerability of incarcerated people to PFAS due to limited exposure mitigation options.The findings underscore environmental justice issues, noting the disproportionate representation of people from marginalized communities within the prison population.Key quote:"If you think of the incarcerated population as a city spread out over this vast archipelago of carceral facilities, it would be the fifth largest city in the country."— Nicholas Shapiro, senior author and medical anthropologist at the University of California, Los AngelesWhy this matters:Research indicates that a significant proportion of America's carceral facilities are located in areas likely contaminated with PFAS, exacerbating health risks for incarcerated populations, which are already in worse health overall compared to the general population. But PFAS is also a broad threat to U.S. drinking water: Last year, the EPA released proposed drinking water standards for six “forever chemicals.” The announcement came after years of pleas from exposed communities, scientists and health and environmental activists.

GoGreenNation News: Agents of Change in Environmental Justice Podcast: 2021 episodes
GoGreenNation News: Agents of Change in Environmental Justice Podcast: 2021 episodes

The Agents of Change in Environmental Justice podcast features the stories, research and big ideas from past and present program fellows and other environmental justice leaders.Below are archived episodes from 2021. To see the most recent podcasts, click here or subscribe at iTunes or Spotify.Year in review Agents of Change in Environmental Justice · Year in reviewGavin Rienne Agents of Change in Environmental Justice · Gavin Rienne on children's health and natural disastersRead the transcript. Lariah Edwards Agents of Change in Environmental Justice · Lariah Edwards on hormone-altering chemicalsRead the transcript. Daniel Carrión Agents of Change in Environmental Justice · Daniel Carrión on the heat stroke or go broke dilemmaRead the transcript. Max Aung and Tracey Woodruff Agents of Change in Environmental Justice · Max Aung and Tracey Woodruff on shaping environmental chemical policyRead the transcript. Carlos GouldAgents of Change in Environmental Justice · Carlos Gould on global energy poverty and indoor air pollutionRead the transcript. Pallavi PantAgents of Change in Environmental Justice · Pallavi Pant on decolonizing global air pollution researchRead the transcript.Azmal HossanAgents of Change in Environmental Justice · Azmal Hossan on the sociology of climate crises in South AsiaRead the transcript. Tatiana Height Agents of Change in Environmental Justice · Tatiana Height on the importance of cultural perspectives in environmental educationRead the transcript. What Netflix's "The Chair" says about diversity in scienceAgents of Change in Environmental Justice · Ami and Yoshi discuss what Netflix's "The Chair" says about diversity in scienceDeniss Martinez Agents of Change in Environmental Justice · Deniss Martinez on Indigenous science and cultural fire practicesRead the transcript. MỹDzung ChuAgents of Change in Environmental Justice · MỹDzung Chu on healthy housing and social justiceRead the transcript. Brian Bienkowski Agents of Change in Environmental Justice · Brian Bienkowski on amplifying diverse voices through podcastingRead the transcript. Adrift in the diasporaAgents of Change in Environmental Justice · Adrift in the diasporaKartik Amarnath Agents of Change in Environmental Justice · Kartik Amarnath on community empowermentRead the transcript.Misbath DaoudaAgents of Change in Environmental Justice · Misbath Daouda on centering equity in energy transitionsRead the transcript.Regan PattersonAgents of Change in Environmental Justice · LISTEN: Regan Patterson on transportation justiceRead the transcript.Reginald Tucker-SeeleyAgents of Change in Environmental Justice · LISTEN: Reginald Tucker-Seeley on how racism is a threat to public healthRead the transcript. Jamaji Nwanaji-EnweremAgents of Change in Environmental Justice · LISTEN: Jamaji Nwanaji-Enwerem on healing with medicine, research, and policyRead the transcript. Shanna Swan and Annie Hoang Agents of Change in Environmental Justice · Fertility & Environmental Justice: A conversation with Shanna Swan and Annie HoangRead the transcript. Abrania MarreroAgents of Change in Environmental Health · Abrania Marrero on dietary colonialism in Puerto RicoRead the transcript. Veena SinglaAgents of Change in Environmental Health · Veena Singla on turning science into policyRead the transcript.April BallardAgents of Change in Environmental Health · April Ballard on the importance of empathy in public health researchRead the transcript.Yoshira Ornelas Van HorneEHN · Yoshira Ornelas Van Horne's trailblazing journey in environmental healthRead the transcript.Krystal VasquezEHN · Krystal Vasquez's push for disability inclusion in STEMRead the transcript. OreOluwa BadakiEHN · OreOluwa Badaki on intergenerational learning and food justiceRead the transcript. Brianna VanNoy Environmental Health News · Brianna VanNoy’s plan to integrate medicine and health justiceRead the transcript. Dana WilliamsonEnvironmental Health News · Dana Williamson on bringing communities to the forefront of environmental justice researchRead the transcript.

GoGreenNation News: Environmental Health Sciences, in collaboration with ALTAVOZ LAB, welcome their 2023-2024 Environmental Fellows
GoGreenNation News: Environmental Health Sciences, in collaboration with ALTAVOZ LAB, welcome their 2023-2024 Environmental Fellows

Environmental Health Sciences, which publishes EHN.org, and ALTAVOZ LAB proudly introduce Alejandra Martinez and Wendy Selene Pérez as the 2023-2024 Environmental Fellows. For the past 9 months, the two journalists have investigated how fenceline residents near the Houston Ship Channel are affected by pollution from the massive petrochemical buildout in the region. This spring they’ll undertake an innovative, on-the-ground outreach effort to ensure impacted communities have access to their reporting and to foster dialogue around solutions.Alejandra Martinez is The Texas Tribune’s Fort Worth-based environmental reporter. She joined the Tribune in the fall of 2022. Alejandra was previously an accountability reporter at KERA, where she began as a Report for America corps member and then covered Dallas City Hall. Before that, she worked as an associate producer at WLRN, South Florida’s public radio station. Alejandra studied journalism at the University of Texas at Austin, and interned at KUT and NPR’s Latino USA. She’s a native of the Aldine area of Harris County and speaks fluent Spanish.Wendy Selene Pérez is a freelance journalist with a two-decade career spanning various media outlets in Mexico, Argentina, and the United States. Her work focuses on social justice, victims of violence, government accountability, transparency, and immigration. Wendy’s articles have been featured in El País, Gatopardo, Proceso, The Baffler, Vice, and Al Día Dallas/The Dallas Morning News. She has held positions such as bureau chief of CNN Mexico, editor of Domingo magazine (El Universal), and multimedia editor of Clarin.com. Previously, she served as the chief multimedia editor of the newspaper Mural (Grupo Reforma). Wendy holds a Master’s Degree in Journalism from Diario Clarín-Universidad de San Andrés-Columbia University, with her thesis titled “La Tierra de las Fosas,” a data-driven journalistic investigation. She has been honored with the National Journalism Awards in Mexico (2019, 2022), the Walter Reuter German Journalism Award (2020), the Breach-Valdez Human Rights Award (2022, 2023), the Texas APME 2021 News Spanish-Language award, the ICFJ’s COVID-19 reporting story contest, and received an honorable mention in the Latin American Investigative Journalism Award (COLPIN, 2022).Perla Trevizo is a reporter for the ProPublica-Texas Tribune Investigative Initiative. Trevizo is a Mexican-American reporter born in Ciudad Juárez and raised across the border in El Paso, Texas, where she began her journalism career. Trevizo spent more than 10 years covering immigration and border issues in Tennessee and Arizona before joining the Houston Chronicle as an environmental reporter. Her work has earned her national and state awards including the Dori J. Maynard Award for Diversity in Journalism, French-American Foundation Immigration Journalism Award, and a national Edward R. Murrow for a story done in collaboration with Arizona Public Media. She was also honored as the 2019 Arizona Journalist of the Year by the Arizona Newspaper AssociationALTAVOZ LAB is a mentorship organization designed to produce collaborative projects to strengthen reporters at community outlets that serve Black, Indigenous, immigrant and other communities of color in the U.S. with the goal of publishing stories that will enable local audiences to participate fully in democracy. "We want to invest in journalists who tell stories not only about but for marginalized communities in innovative ways, fostering collaborations between local publications and Spanish-speaking outlets to deliver information where it can have the greatest impact,” said Valeria Fernández, founder and executive director of ALTAVOZ LAB which started in 2022." This collaboration between Alejandra Martinez and Wendy Selene Pérez is a powerful example of what's possible when we center our journalism on those most impacted by public policies, striving to serve them."The fellows will bolster community networks and bring information about the health and environmental consequences of the expansion of petrochemical projects in Texas to audiences who normally do not have access to such information. Their work will be published in both English and Spanish Support of the ALTAVOZ LAB environmental fellowship is a crucial component of Environmental Health Sciences’ commitment to increasing access to environmental health and justice reporting in Spanish through our EHN en Español initiative. Stay tuned for our upcoming reporting projects.

GoGreenNation News: This diet will likely keep you alive longer — and help the planet
GoGreenNation News: This diet will likely keep you alive longer — and help the planet

People who closely follow an environmentally conscious plant-heavy diet that also includes modest portions of meat and dairy, dubbed the Planetary Health Diet, have a 30% lower risk of premature death from common causes such as cancer and heart disease, according to new research. The study, led by the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and published today in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, suggests that our diets can play dual roles of saving us and the planet. “Climate change has our planet on track for ecological disaster, and our food system plays a major role,” said corresponding author Walter Willett, professor of epidemiology and nutrition at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, in a statement. “Shifting how we eat can help slow the process of climate change. And what’s healthiest for the planet is also healthiest for humans.” The EAT-Lancet Commission created the diet as part of a 2019 report that outlined how to feed a growing planet in a healthy way and avoid exacerbating climate change and environmental impacts from food production. It is “a plant-forward diet where whole grains, fruits, vegetables, nuts and legumes comprise a greater proportion of foods consumed.” It avoids most processed and ultra-processed foods, but still allows for meat and dairy consumption. "What’s healthiest for the planet is also healthiest for humans.” - Walter Willett, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public HealthThe diet suggests that roughly half of your plate should be fruits and vegetables, and the other half should be nearly all whole grains or plant protein. Dairy, animal proteins, starchy vegetables (like potatoes) and sugars are allowed in smaller portions.The plan goes beyond diet and encourages regenerative farming and cooking at home rather than eating out. Its focus on plant-based foods is aimed at reducing greenhouse gas emissions from livestock. Research shows transitioning to plant-based diets could reduce diet related land-use by 76% and greenhouse gas emissions by 49%.Willett and colleagues examined data from more than 200,000 people who were disease-free at the start of the study. Each participant completed questionnaires about their diets and health every four years for up to 34 years.The 10% of people that most closely followed the Planetary Health Diet had a 30% lower risk of premature death compared to the 10% of people in the group that least followed the diet. The researchers also estimated that those most closely following the diet had contributed 29% fewer greenhouse gas emissions, 21% lower fertilizer needs and 51% lower cropland use compared to those who followed the diet the least.“Our study is noteworthy given that the U.S. Department of Agriculture has refused to consider the environmental impacts of dietary choices and any reference to the environmental effects of diet will not be allowed in the upcoming revision of the U.S. Dietary Guidelines,” said Willett. “The findings show just how linked human and planetary health are.” See the full study here, and learn more about the Planetary Health Diet.

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