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GoGreenNation News: The business case for climate resiliency
GoGreenNation News: The business case for climate resiliency

Resiliency. As the climate around us changes, this concept is dominating conversations from the water cooler to the C-suite. But what does it really mean? Weather can be one of the biggest impact on business efficiency and operations, yet it remains an underappreciated risk in the boardroom. The growing frequency and severity of natural disasters and extreme weather events, as reported by the World Economic Forum, can upend even the best-laid business plans. The time has come for a radical shift in how we approach weather preparednessand build resilience. As the co-founder and CEO of Tomorrow.io, a leading weather intelligence and climate resilience platform, I’ve seen this firsthand during my time in the military, and my cofounders and I realized that the weather industry was behind. With the accelerating impacts of climate change, this presented an enormous challenge. We’re now on a mission to help businesses and governments turn the weather from a risk to a revenue driver by building resilience. Why businesses need better weather intelligence The business case for better weather intelligence is compelling. According to Moody’s, trillions of dollars in global sectors’ debt are highly exposed to environmental risks each year. In 2023 alone, Tomorrow.io customers were under threat from weather 2 million times, meaning we identified specific operational impacts and provided actionable guidance to mitigate the associated risks. For companies operating on thin margins in weather-sensitive industries, even small improvements in forecast accuracy can translate into significant gains. JetBlue, for example, saved $4 million per year by optimizing operations based on precision forecasts. A leading rideshare company leveraged our platform to pre-position vehicles ahead of demand spikes, leading to a 12% increase in ride requests. Even cash-strapped local governments have realized up to $15,000 in savings per winter storm through data-driven resource allocation. Yet despite these compelling proof points, the vast potential of weather intelligence remains largely untapped. Too many organizations still treat weather as an uncontrollable external factor, reacting to disruptions after the fact rather than proactively managing risk. We see this pattern play out with disturbing regularity, whether it’s hurricanes, floods, wildfires or winter storms. Post-event rescue and recovery efforts, while noble and necessary, are a poor substitute for data-driven preparedness. It’s time for a paradigm shift from post-event response to pre-event resilience, both to save lives and to protect bottom lines. We can now leverage weather technology for planning The good news is that a solution is within reach. By harnessing next-generation space technology, advanced AI, and the power of cloud computing, we can democratize access to hyperaccurate, hyperlocal, and hyperrelevant weather insights on a global scale. Armed with this intelligence, businesses can optimize staffing, inventory, and logistics to minimize disruptions and maximize profitability. Governments can stage emergency assets with pinpoint precision to protect lives and livelihoods. We’re now seeing how these solutions can impact people’s lives and the bottom line. Our weather intelligence platform is powered by a constellation of cutting-edge radar satellites, proprietary AI, and the world’s most accurate weather models—we’re bringing an unprecedented level of precision and actionability to weather forecasting on a global scale used by industry leaders like JetBlue, Fox Sports, Uber, Ford, and the U.S. Air Force. Extreme weather may be inevitable, but business disruption and economic losses don’t have to be. As climate change continues to accelerate, the imperative for better weather intelligence has never been greater. It’s time for boardrooms and situation rooms alike to put weather at the center of their operational strategy. With the right technology and the right mindset, we can turn the weather from the biggest business risk to the biggest business opportunity. The choice is ours. Shimon Elkabetz is CEO and cofounder of Tomorrow.io.

GoGreenNation News: Indigenous land rights crucial for climate success
GoGreenNation News: Indigenous land rights crucial for climate success

Giving Indigenous communities greater control over their lands significantly improves conservation results, according to a new study in One Earth. Anita Hofschneider reports for Grist. In short:Researchers analyzed 648 studies of conservation areas, comparing the ecological and social outcomes based on the degree of Indigenous involvement.The study found that recognizing Indigenous autonomy leads to significantly better environmental and social results than merely treating them as stakeholders.Examples include successful conservation in Chile’s Los Lagos Indigenous Marine Areas and ineffective efforts in China’s Hainan province due to lack of Indigenous involvement. Key quote: “The findings reveal that more equitable governance, based on equal partnership or primary control for [Indigenous peoples and local communities], are associated with significantly more positive ecological outcomes.” — Study authors Why this matters: Indigenous communities have long been the stewards of vast tracts of land, preserving biodiversity and maintaining ecological balance through traditional knowledge and sustainable practices. Studies indicate that these lands support healthier ecosystems and store more carbon, an important factor in mitigating climate change. However, these benefits are jeopardized when Indigenous land rights are overlooked or violated. Related EHN coverage: Opinion: Protecting Indigenous children means protecting water Colonialism, the climate crisis, and the need to center Indigenous voices Hands on the land, heart in community: Returning cultural fires

GoGreenNation News: Survey: Americans ready to take climate action
GoGreenNation News: Survey: Americans ready to take climate action

Most Americans are willing to take steps to help address climate change, a new survey finds.Why it matters: While some Americans still haven't accepted climate change's impact, most believe it's a major threat.What they did: Environmental company Veolia and French research and consulting firm Elabe polled 2,000 U.S. adults online between Oct. 17 and Nov. 6, 2023, as part of their "Barometer of Ecological Transformation," a regular report on global views surrounding climate change.What they found: 61% of Americans feel vulnerable to a lower quality of life due to climate change, while 57% worry about climate-related health risks, per the survey.61% of Americans are open to drinking recycled wastewater in the face of water shortages, 74% would eat food grown using recycled water, and 82% would pay more to filter microplastics out of their drinking water.The margin of error for the U.S. data is 1-2.2 percentage points.What they're saying: "If you had to retain one thing from this barometer, it's that Americans are craving action now — they're ready for it and looking for it," Veolia CEO Estelle Brachlianoff tells Axios.Reality check: Personal behavior changes and interventions are great, but truly addressing climate change requires action on the part of governments and big corporations.What's next: People may become even more likely to embrace climate adaptations as they see firsthand evidence of a changing planet, like hotter summers, more wildfire smoke and so on."Maybe this is the one thing joining humanity across the globe," Brachlianoff says. "We've all lived it, you know — at times it takes shocks."

GoGreenNation News: Nearly all states embrace EPA's climate initiative
GoGreenNation News: Nearly all states embrace EPA's climate initiative

In a sweeping movement, 45 states have rallied behind the Environmental Protection Agency's Climate Pollution Reduction Grants Program, embracing more than $250 million in federal grants to combat greenhouse emissions, with only five states sitting out.Tracy J. Wholf reports for CBS News.In short:The program, spurred by the 2022 Inflation Reduction Act, funds strategies for reducing climate pollution while promoting economic opportunities in clean industries.Despite all states being eligible, Florida, Iowa, Kentucky, South Dakota, and Wyoming opted out, forfeiting a $3 million allocation each, though cities within these states still participated.This initiative supports public health by reducing environmental pollution and aims to cover more than 96% of the U.S. with climate action plans.Key quote:"The diversity of ideas and ambitious initiatives from all across the country reflect the seriousness that states and metropolitan areas are bringing to the work of cutting pollution, acting on climate change, and meeting their local objectives."— Jennifer Macedonia, deputy assistant administrator for EPA's Office of Air and RadiationWhy this matters:In the last few years it’s become increasingly evident that climate-driven disasters are affecting public health. The EPA’s climate grant funding encourages states to engage in an inclusive approach, advocating for partnerships across governmental levels, non-profits, and the private sector to pool resources and expertise for greater impact.

GoGreenNation News: Fuel emissions debate fuels Australia's climate conversation
GoGreenNation News: Fuel emissions debate fuels Australia's climate conversation

In a country where the pickup truck is a symbol of the working class, Australia's move toward fuel emissions standards signifies a major policy shift, reflecting global environmental concerns.Michael E. Miller reports for The Washington Post.In short:Australia's lack of fuel emissions standards has placed it alongside countries like Russia and Turkey, contributing to higher pollution levels from older, less efficient vehicles.The proposed regulations aim to align Australia with international standards by 2028, allowing high-emitting vehicles but offsetting them with cleaner models or facing penalties.Critics label the initiative as a "ute tax," predicting price hikes for cars, though the government and some think tanks argue the impact on prices will be minimal.Key quote:"It’s astounding that we haven’t done it until now. It’s the lowest of low-hanging fruit."— Matt Grudnoff, economist at the Australia InstituteWhy this matters:Fuel emissions standards are essential for reducing the carbon footprint of the transportation sector, which is a significant contributor to global greenhouse gas emissions. By enforcing stricter regulations, governments can compel automotive manufacturers to innovate and develop more fuel-efficient and less polluting vehicles, such as hybrids and fully electric cars.A children's health expert, seeing our kids imperiled by fossil fuels and climate change, calls for a kids-first revamp of energy policies.

GoGreenNation News: Youth at the forefront of climate change litigation
GoGreenNation News: Youth at the forefront of climate change litigation

Young climate advocates are challenging the U.S. government in court, demanding accountability for climate change inactions.Ruxandra Guidi reports for High Country News.In short:Young activists, including a notable 23-year-old plaintiff in the Juliana v. United States case, leverage legal battles to hold the U.S. government accountable for climate negligence.These legal challenges, rooted in the Atmospheric Trust Litigation principle, assert the government's failure to protect the constitutional rights of its younger citizens.Historical context shows that youth have always been pivotal in driving significant political movements, emphasizing the enduring power of young voices in societal change.Key quote:“There are simple things you can do in your own homes, like not let the water run, or turn off the lights when you’re not using them. You could teach these things to your children. Every choice we make is for or against our future.”— 6-year-old Xiuhtezcatl MartinezWhy this matters:The impact of youth activism is undeniable. It has reinvigorated older generations of environmentalists, brought climate issues to the forefront of political debates, and even influenced the strategies of nonprofit organizations and advocacy groups. Their call for action is not just about reducing carbon emissions or protecting natural habitats but encompasses a broader vision of social justice, equity, and intergenerational responsibility.Youth environmental activism has moved us forward in many ways—but to maximize this impact we need coalitions that learn from the past in order to prepare for the future.

Cinema Verde Presents: Climate Emergency: Feedback Loops Part 1 - Introduction
Cinema Verde Presents: Climate Emergency: Feedback Loops Part 1 - Introduction

Past Presentation | Fossil fuel emissions from human activity are driving up Earth’s temperature—yet something else is at work. The warming has set in motion nature’s own feedback loops which are raising temperatures even higher. The urgent question is: Are we approaching a point of no return, leading to an uninhabitable Earth, or do we have the vision and will to slow, halt, and reverse them? Subtitled in 23 languages and narrated by Richard Gere, Climate Emergency: Feedback Loops is a series of five short films, featuring twelve leading climate scientists, that explores how human-caused emissions are triggering nature’s own warming loops. We submit the five shorts to your festival (total 57:44) for screening of any or all of the films. The film series had its official launch with the Dalai Lama, Greta Thunberg and world-renowned scientists in a webcast, “The Dalai Lama with Greta Thunberg and Leading Scientists: A Conversation on the Crisis of Climate Feedback Loops. ”While scientists stay up worrying about this most dangerous aspect of climate change, the public has little awareness or understanding of feedback loops. Climate change discussion at all levels of society largely leaves out the most critical dynamic of climate change itself. It is urgent we remedy this. The first film in the series, Introduction (13:09), provides an overview of the feedback loop problem. The four other short films explore important climate feedback mechanisms: Forests (14:10), Permafrost (10:55), Atmosphere (8:45) and Albedo (10:35).Greenhouse gases from fossil fuels, such as carbon dioxide and methane, are warming the planet. This warming is then setting in motion dozens of feedback mechanisms, which then feed upon themselves, as well as interact with each other and spiral further out of control. These processes are rapidly accelerating climate change. An example of a climate feedback loop is the melting of the permafrost. In the Northern Hemisphere, permafrost makes up nearly 25% of the landmass. As heat-trapping emissions warm the Earth, this frozen tundra is melting. As it does, large amounts of carbon dioxide and methane are released, which further warm the planet, melting more permafrost in a self-perpetuating loop. Human activity kicks off these feedback loops, but once set in motion, they become self-sustaining. The danger is that this process reaches a tipping point beyond which it is extremely difficult to recover. This is why it is urgent to reduce greenhouse gas emissions so we can slow, halt and even reverse these feedbacks and cool the planet.

Cinema Verde Presents: Climate Emergency: Feedback Loops Part 3 - Permafrost
Cinema Verde Presents: Climate Emergency: Feedback Loops Part 3 - Permafrost

Past Presentation | Permafrost, an icy expanse of frozen ground covering one-quarter of the Northern Hemisphere, is thawing. As it does, microscopic animals are waking up and feeding on the previously frozen carbon stored in plant and animal remains, releasing heat-trapping gases as a byproduct. These gases warm the atmosphere further, melting more permafrost in a dangerous feedback loop. With permafrost containing twice as much carbon as the atmosphere, its thaw could release 150 billion tons of carbon by the end of the century. Subtitled in 23 languages and narrated by Richard Gere, Climate Emergency: Feedback Loops is a series of five short films, featuring twelve leading climate scientists, that explores how human-caused emissions are triggering nature’s own warming loops. We submit the five shorts to your festival (total 57:44) for screening of any or all of the films. The film series had its official launch with the Dalai Lama, Greta Thunberg and world-renowned scientists in a webcast, “The Dalai Lama with Greta Thunberg and Leading Scientists: A Conversation on the Crisis of Climate Feedback Loops. ”While scientists stay up worrying about this most dangerous aspect of climate change, the public has little awareness or understanding of feedback loops. Climate change discussion at all levels of society largely leaves out the most critical dynamic of climate change itself. It is urgent we remedy this. The first film in the series, Introduction (13:09), provides an overview of the feedback loop problem. The four other short films explore important climate feedback mechanisms: Forests (14:10), Permafrost (10:55), Atmosphere (8:45) and Albedo (10:35).Greenhouse gases from fossil fuels, such as carbon dioxide and methane, are warming the planet. This warming is then setting in motion dozens of feedback mechanisms, which then feed upon themselves, as well as interact with each other and spiral further out of control. These processes are rapidly accelerating climate change. An example of a climate feedback loop is the melting of the permafrost. In the Northern Hemisphere, permafrost makes up nearly 25% of the landmass. As heat-trapping emissions warm the Earth, this frozen tundra is melting. As it does, large amounts of carbon dioxide and methane are released, which further warm the planet, melting more permafrost in a self-perpetuating loop. Human activity kicks off these feedback loops, but once set in motion, they become self-sustaining. The danger is that this process reaches a tipping point beyond which it is extremely difficult to recover. This is why it is urgent to reduce greenhouse gas emissions so we can slow, halt and even reverse these feedbacks and cool the planet.

Cinema Verde Presents: Climate Emergency: Feedback Loops Part 5 - Albedo
Cinema Verde Presents: Climate Emergency: Feedback Loops Part 5 - Albedo

Past Presentation | The reflectivity of snow and ice at the poles, known as the albedo effect, is one of Earth’s most important cooling mechanisms. But global warming has reduced this reflectivity drastically, setting off a dangerous warming loop: as more Arctic ice and snow melt, the albedo effect decreases, warming the Arctic further, and melting more ice and snow. The volume of Arctic ice has already shrunk 75% In the past 40 years, and scientists predict that the Arctic Ocean will be completely ice-free during the summer months by the end of the century. Subtitled in 23 languages and narrated by Richard Gere, Climate Emergency: Feedback Loops is a series of five short films, featuring twelve leading climate scientists, that explores how human-caused emissions are triggering nature’s own warming loops. We submit the five shorts to your festival (total 57:44) for screening of any or all of the films. The film series had its official launch with the Dalai Lama, Greta Thunberg and world-renowned scientists in a webcast, “The Dalai Lama with Greta Thunberg and Leading Scientists: A Conversation on the Crisis of Climate Feedback Loops. ”While scientists stay up worrying about this most dangerous aspect of climate change, the public has little awareness or understanding of feedback loops. Climate change discussion at all levels of society largely leaves out the most critical dynamic of climate change itself. It is urgent we remedy this. The first film in the series, Introduction (13:09), provides an overview of the feedback loop problem. The four other short films explore important climate feedback mechanisms: Forests (14:10), Permafrost (10:55), Atmosphere (8:45) and Albedo (10:35).Greenhouse gases from fossil fuels, such as carbon dioxide and methane, are warming the planet. This warming is then setting in motion dozens of feedback mechanisms, which then feed upon themselves, as well as interact with each other and spiral further out of control. These processes are rapidly accelerating climate change. An example of a climate feedback loop is the melting of the permafrost. In the Northern Hemisphere, permafrost makes up nearly 25% of the landmass. As heat-trapping emissions warm the Earth, this frozen tundra is melting. As it does, large amounts of carbon dioxide and methane are released, which further warm the planet, melting more permafrost in a self-perpetuating loop. Human activity kicks off these feedback loops, but once set in motion, they become self-sustaining. The danger is that this process reaches a tipping point beyond which it is extremely difficult to recover. This is why it is urgent to reduce greenhouse gas emissions so we can slow, halt and even reverse these feedbacks and cool the planet.

Cinema Verde Presents: Climate Emergency: Feedback Loops Part 4 - Atmosphere
Cinema Verde Presents: Climate Emergency: Feedback Loops Part 4 - Atmosphere

Past Presentation | Global warming is altering Earth’s weather patterns dramatically. A warmer atmosphere absorbs more water vapor, which in turn traps more heat and warms the planet further in an accelerating feedback loop. Climate change is also disrupting the jet stream, triggering a feedback loop that brings warm air northward, and causes weather patterns to stall in place for longer. Subtitled in 23 languages and narrated by Richard Gere, Climate Emergency: Feedback Loops is a series of five short films, featuring twelve leading climate scientists, that explores how human-caused emissions are triggering nature’s own warming loops. We submit the five shorts to your festival (total 57:44) for screening of any or all of the films. The film series had its official launch with the Dalai Lama, Greta Thunberg and world-renowned scientists in a webcast, “The Dalai Lama with Greta Thunberg and Leading Scientists: A Conversation on the Crisis of Climate Feedback Loops. ”While scientists stay up worrying about this most dangerous aspect of climate change, the public has little awareness or understanding of feedback loops. Climate change discussion at all levels of society largely leaves out the most critical dynamic of climate change itself. It is urgent we remedy this. The first film in the series, Introduction (13:09), provides an overview of the feedback loop problem. The four other short films explore important climate feedback mechanisms: Forests (14:10), Permafrost (10:55), Atmosphere (8:45) and Albedo (10:35).Greenhouse gases from fossil fuels, such as carbon dioxide and methane, are warming the planet. This warming is then setting in motion dozens of feedback mechanisms, which then feed upon themselves, as well as interact with each other and spiral further out of control. These processes are rapidly accelerating climate change. An example of a climate feedback loop is the melting of the permafrost. In the Northern Hemisphere, permafrost makes up nearly 25% of the landmass. As heat-trapping emissions warm the Earth, this frozen tundra is melting. As it does, large amounts of carbon dioxide and methane are released, which further warm the planet, melting more permafrost in a self-perpetuating loop. Human activity kicks off these feedback loops, but once set in motion, they become self-sustaining. The danger is that this process reaches a tipping point beyond which it is extremely difficult to recover. This is why it is urgent to reduce greenhouse gas emissions so we can slow, halt and even reverse these feedbacks and cool the planet.

GoGreenNation News: Mexico’s Likely Next President Is a Climate Scientist
GoGreenNation News: Mexico’s Likely Next President Is a Climate Scientist

On Sunday, Mexico is likely to elect its first woman president: a left-wing climate scientist, contributing author to a report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, and former mayor of Mexico City. Claudia Sheinbaum, who’s running in a coalition led by her ruling Morena party, is widely favored to succeed her longtime ally Andrés Manuel López Obrador, known as AMLO. Sunday’s elections will also come on the heels of a deadly heat wave and a dire, climate-fueled water crisis that could see Mexico City run out of water as early as next month. So what could a prospective Sheinbaum administration mean for Mexico’s climate policies?The water crisis hasn’t become a top issue in this election, says Edwin Ackerman, a sociology professor specializing in Latin American studies at Syracuse University’s Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs. That’s thanks in part, he explains, to the fact that states governed by parties across the political spectrum have faced their own water crises in recent years, “so it’s not really politicized in a concrete way.” While opposition candidate Xóchitl Gálvez’s center-right coalition has tried to focus the election on questions of crime and violence—especially that related to drug trafficking—much of the debate domestically has revolved around the future of a suite of popular social programs implemented by AMLO’s government, including a universal pension for Mexicans over the age of 65 as well as cash transfers to students, working mothers, and people with disabilities. “It’s electorally unviable to openly criticize them,” Ackerman says. Gálvez—whose National Action Party voted against those programs—is now in the awkward position of both defending their existence while criticizing them as wasteful, clientelistic handouts to the poor.Sheinbaum, who served as AMLO’s environment secretary, is looking to build on the success of those social programs, which have also involved raising the minimum wage and making it easier to organize new unions. One of the areas where she’s likely to differ the most from her predecessor is in her approach to climate and environmental issues.Sheinbaum unveiled her climate platform on March 18, a national holiday commemorating the 1938 nationalization of Mexico’s oil reserves. Her platform includes a goal to have 50 percent of Mexico’s electricity demand met through zero-carbon sources by 2030, using a mix of wind and solar as well as hydroelectric and geothermal power; investing $13.6 billion in renewable energy; adding nearly 2,400 miles of transmission lines; and expanding on her work as mayor of Mexico City in expanding electrified mass transit via buses and passenger trains. Sheinbaum’s climate campaign leans heavily on strengthening and transforming Mexico’s state-owned enterprises, including beleaguered oil producer Pemex and the utility Comisión Federal de Electricidad, or CFA. This might sound odd for readers in the United States, where—with notable exceptions—both electricity and energy production are largely controlled by for-profit companies. Mexico’s Constitution, though, stipulates that the country’s transmission and distribution lines must be state-owned, while generation and retail capacities—i.e., who makes the power and who you pay your bills to—can be run by the private sector. AMLO’s government has looked to reverse power-sector liberalization carried out by Enrique Peña Nieto’s government starting in 2013, which guaranteed private companies a segment of that market. Now more than 60 percent of power generation must be state-owned.Private energy developers that have launched legal challenges to AMLO’s reforms under the U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement, or USMCA, have argued that these changes threaten both their profits and climate and environmental goals. They point to the fact that the state-owned utility CFA’s generation capacity is largely fossil fuel–powered. “By that narrative, public energy is dirty and green energy is coming from the private sector,” says Ackerman. The reality is more complicated. While AMLO has certainly emphasized a largely fossil fuel–powered vision of energy sovereignty, Ackerman notes—pushing through a refinery development in the southern state of Tabasco, and other infrastructure projects that have been controversial among environmental advocates—there’s no straightforward reason why state-owned companies are fated to be dirtier than private-sector energy developers. Alonso Romero, the Sheinbaum campaign’s energy ambassador of dialogues for transformation, sees Mexico’s state-owned enterprises as an asset not just for the energy transition but for building competitive green export sectors. An early step will be refinancing Pemex’s considerable debt; the world’s most indebted oil producer, Pemex has $6.8 billion in bonds coming due next year. In renegotiating Pemex’s debt, Sheinbaum has stated that she intends for its long-term plans to include new investments in lower-carbon lines of business. “In the face of climate change,” she said last month, “Pemex has to enter new markets.”A Sheinbaum government, Romero told me during our conversation last Saturday, will emphasize coordination among Mexico’s state-owned firms so as to best play to their strengths. Mexico, for instance, has massive geothermal energy reserves, which can be accessed with drilling techniques already utilized by Pemex workers and engineers. That zero-carbon power could then be used for green hydrogen development in partnership with CFE, which can leverage its own expertise in scaling up wind and solar power. Having holistic planning across government departments and state-owned enterprises, Romero told me, can help to meet today’s energy needs while planning for the future and protecting ratepayers from volatility.“It’s cheaper and more efficient to implement these policies through state-owned companies,” Romero told me. “We believe that state-owned companies have a longer-term horizon that can sustain these kinds of investments. Sometimes private companies don’t, or the investment and return horizons are not within the range that investors are expecting, so they need to be incentivized and subsidized,” he added. These investments will still involve a sizable role for the private sector—particularly for financing—but higher-level coordination, Romero argues, can offer investors, certainly in terms of pricing and scheduling, things that private sector–led projects often can’t. In the U.S., for instance, several high-profile offshore wind projects have been canceled in recent months by developers citing supply chain constraints, insufficient subsidies, and related disinterest from investors seeking larger and steadier returns.“Energy transitions are faster if implemented by the state,” Romero said, and better at meeting goals other than profit, like expanding access to cleaner and more affordable electricity. “It’s not that it’s not possible with the private sector only, but it’s faster, easier, and cheaper to mandate a public company do something rather than incentivize and subsidize private companies to do something they might not end up doing.” There’s evidence to back up that approach, even if it might seem a bit alien in the U.S. Researchers at MIT’s Center for Energy and Environmental Policy Research found that state-owned utilities in the European Union had a “significantly higher tendency” to invest in renewables than their private-sector counterparts.Not all of Sheinbaum’s plans will be great news for climate advocates. Her plan for PEMEX involves boosting refinery capacity, investing heavily in petrochemicals, and increasing oil production to 1.8 million barrels per day before stabilizing it there. “We believe that Pemex needs to continue to produce oil and gas,” Romero told me, noting that Pemex won’t follow a similar path to Dong Energy, the Danish state-owned fossil fuel firm that has transformed into a major wind power developer, Ørsted.Private investors may also be angry, since they stand to lose market share to state-owned competitors. Though the U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement excised many of the dubious investor-state dispute settlement clauses found in its predecessor—the North American Free Trade Agreement, or Nafta—investors in Mexico’s energy sector are still eligible to sue the state for infringing on their expected profits. Fourteen of the 16 claims brought against governments under the USMCA have been brought against Mexico, many of them asserting that the government’s preference for state-owned generation unfairly targets their own, cleaner energy projects. The U.S. itself, in 2022, requested “consultations” under that treaty in the name of the climate, alleging (among other things) that amendments to Mexico’s electricity law would “prioritize the distribution of CFE-generated power over cleaner sources of energy provided by private sector suppliers, such as wind and solar.”How the U.S. might react to a state-led energy transition—and how successful that transition will be—remains to be seen. The more immediate concern for a Sheinbaum government over trade with its northern neighbor relates to a country very far away from either: China. As the U.S. implements increasingly punitive tariffs on Chinese electric vehicles, semiconductors, and renewables, that is, politicians here have fretted that Chinese firms will see Mexico as a place to sneak their products into the U.S. under the auspices of its free trade partner just to the south. Given that the United States is Mexico’s most important trading partner, AMLO’s government has trodden carefully on this front, declining, for example, to extend incentives like cheaper land and tax breaks to Chinese automaker BYD as it looks to build a plant there. In any case, Mexico stands to see considerable investment as companies look to chase U.S. clean energy incentives requiring that an escalating percentage of components to green technologies, including E.V.s, be sourced either in the U.S. or from countries with which it has a free trade agreement.Romero stressed that Sheinbaum’s government would be keen to avoid Mexico being merely a source of cheap labor and resources in the energy transition, for companies either from the U.S. or who are looking for ways to access that market. “We want to have high-paying jobs here,” he told me. “We lived through that with the first wave of ‘nearshoring’ with Nafta. Very high up on the agenda is to invest in technology and basic science. It’s going to be an industrial policy more like the Entrepreneurial State,” he said, referencing Mariana Mazzucato’s 2011 book on the central role of governments in fueling innovation. “The state must take risks. The state must be a de-risking agent, but also the state must grow capacities in the public sector.”Part of that approach will be developing the country’s lithium sector. Unlike in the nearby “lithium triangle,” spanning Chile, Argentina, and Bolivia, the vast majority of Mexico’s comparatively modest lithium reserves are held in clay in the Sonoran Desert. Accessing those resources is extraordinarily difficult, which is why Sheinbaum is championing a government-led research effort led by the Mexican Petroleum Institute, or IMP. As of 2022, Mexico’s lithium is legally treated as a “public utility” there, and its extraction will be overseen by the newly created state-owned firm Litio Para Mexico, or LitioMx. Other South American governments have similar arrangements, and Romero signaled that Sheinbaum’s team would be keen to learn from them. In the long run, the hope is for Mexico not just to extract and export lithium but to refine it in-country, as well, as part of fully developed supply chains that include battery production and electric vehicle manufacturing for both export and internal consumption. As Sheinbaum continues to enjoy a commanding lead over Gálvez, Mexico is poised to make history this weekend in electing its first woman as president. Depending on the success of Sheinbaum’s plans, it could also break new ground in another way: by forging a new balance between the public and private sectors’ respective roles in navigating the energy transition.

Cinema Verde Presents: Climate Emergency: Feedback Loops Part 2 - Forests
Cinema Verde Presents: Climate Emergency: Feedback Loops Part 2 - Forests

Past Presentation | The world’s forests are responsible for removing a quarter of all human carbon emissions from the atmosphere and are essential for cooling the planet. But that fraction is shrinking as the three major forests of the world—tropical, boreal, and temperate—succumb to the effects of climate feedback loops. The resulting tree dieback threatens to tip forests from net carbon absorbers to net carbon emitters, heating rather than cooling the planet. Subtitled in 23 languages and narrated by Richard Gere, Climate Emergency: Feedback Loops is a series of five short films, featuring twelve leading climate scientists, that explores how human-caused emissions are triggering nature’s own warming loops. We submit the five shorts to your festival (total 57:44) for screening of any or all of the films. The film series had its official launch with the Dalai Lama, Greta Thunberg and world-renowned scientists in a webcast, “The Dalai Lama with Greta Thunberg and Leading Scientists: A Conversation on the Crisis of Climate Feedback Loops.” While scientists stay up worrying about this most dangerous aspect of climate change, the public has little awareness or understanding of feedback loops. Climate change discussion at all levels of society largely leaves out the most critical dynamic of climate change itself. It is urgent we remedy this. The first film in the series, Introduction (13:09), provides an overview of the feedback loop problem. The four other short films explore important climate feedback mechanisms: Forests (14:10), Permafrost (10:55), Atmosphere (8:45) and Albedo (10:35).Greenhouse gases from fossil fuels, such as carbon dioxide and methane, are warming the planet. This warming is then setting in motion dozens of feedback mechanisms, which then feed upon themselves, as well as interact with each other and spiral further out of control. These processes are rapidly accelerating climate change. An example of a climate feedback loop is the melting of the permafrost. In the Northern Hemisphere, permafrost makes up nearly 25% of the landmass. As heat-trapping emissions warm the Earth, this frozen tundra is melting. As it does, large amounts of carbon dioxide and methane are released, which further warm the planet, melting more permafrost in a self-perpetuating loop. Human activity kicks off these feedback loops, but once set in motion, they become self-sustaining. The danger is that this process reaches a tipping point beyond which it is extremely difficult to recover. This is why it is urgent to reduce greenhouse gas emissions so we can slow, halt and even reverse these feedbacks and cool the planet.

GoGreenNation News: Democrats challenge Biden's opposition to youth climate lawsuit
GoGreenNation News: Democrats challenge Biden's opposition to youth climate lawsuit

Congressional Democrats are calling out the Biden administration for its efforts to derail a pivotal youth-led climate lawsuit.Lesley Clark reports for E&E News.In short:A group of 29 Democratic Congress members and Sen. Bernie Sanders urges the Biden administration to halt its attempts to dismiss the Juliana v. United States climate case.They argue this legal battle is crucial for young Americans seeking to protect their constitutional rights against government inaction on climate change.The Department of Justice's actions to prevent the case from going to trial are deemed unprecedented and a silencing of youth advocacy for environmental justice.Key quote:"As decades of evidence in the record show, the political branches predominantly choose short-term economic gains rather than face the difficult task of solving the issue of climate change head-on."— Congressional Democrats in an amicus briefWhy this matters:Young voters have become a crucial demographic for the Democratic Party, often championing more radical solutions to climate change. Seeing the administration oppose a lawsuit that embodies their fears and hopes for the future might lead to disillusionment or decreased enthusiasm among these younger supporters, potentially affecting voter turnout and support.Plaintiffs in Held vs Montana argue that: “We are entitled to a ‘clean and healthful’ environment. Montana’s policies are endangering that.”

GoGreenNation News: "Climate change is not something to ignore"
GoGreenNation News: "Climate change is not something to ignore"

HOUSTON — This week EHN is publishing letters from eighth grade students at YES Prep Northbrook Middle School in the Houston-area neighborhood of Spring Branch, Texas.English educators Cassandra Harper and Yvette Howard incorporated the environment into a series of lessons in December last year. Each student conducted their own research to begin drafting letters to EHN about their concerns or hopes. EHN reporter Cami Ferrell visited their classrooms to share information about her personal reporting experiences in Houston.The collection of letters, some of which were lightly edited, do not represent the opinions of YES Prep Northbrook or EHN, but are offered here as a peek into the minds of children and their relationship with environmental issues. Read the first and second set of letters. Anali LopezI am writing to discuss the problem of climate change and how we, citizens, are impacted by it, and how we can prevent the situation from worsening. Although people are familiar with this problem, it also feels like it is not addressed enough for people to start advocating for the world. People are not very persuaded when it comes to changing their actions, until they start seeing the dangers of what they caused, so I hope while you are reading this, you can start being more cautious of what you do or at least spread more awareness.Climate change is an issue because it is affecting people's daily lives, health, and environment. People barely want to go outside now because of the rising temperatures and the air pollution. Some are even scared to take their children outside or while pregnant because of the fear of their kids having cancer or developing an illness. Air pollution is not getting worse by itself, it is getting worse by the number of forests burning, and the gas people use for their everyday needs. Even on some days people go outside and see that it is completely fogged outside, but it is all the smoke roaming around from factories burning supplies or gasoline from cars. I have seen people check the weather or air quality on their phone before they go outside to see if it is safe enough to have your skin contact the sun or breathe in the air. Factories are one of the causes of the poor air around the world. Some of the materials people recycle get burned at the end by these factories. Factories are not the only ones guilty of this mess though, vehicles like cars, trucks and planes are also causes of air pollution. Since most motor vehicles need to operate on gasoline, it tends to create harmful fuels and byproducts like carbon or nitrogen dioxide. Which is why you pass by a car sometimes and you will be able to smell the gasoline because of all those strong harmful fuels the gasoline is producing. These situations do not happen once every month or year, this happens every day. Now as a teenager, I see how people mistreat the world and lack the empathy to make a change knowing that it affects people and every living organism like plants and animals. It makes me wonder if I will even be able to have a future, let alone, see the next generation walking on Earth.To address climate change, it is important that Environment Health News spreads more awareness of the danger that climate change has such as public health and environmental impacts. Environmental Health News should also acknowledge publishing more internationally especially in more languages for everyone to be more aware of the situations on Earth. To my readers, I want you to understand that climate change will not get better by itself until we citizens, act and take responsibility because if we do not act, we might not see another day of Earth. One way that environmental activists can help with this is by getting more involved with news and other government agencies to see what methods or steps to take, so we can better our world.With all, thank you for taking your time to read this. I would hope that after, you have a different perspective on how climate change is a very serious topic, and that you decide to at least spread a little bit of awareness. Please if you are willing to save and take action for our world, act now.- Anali LopezEvelyn NunezI know we have many issues in the world, but climate change needs to be addressed, or no other problem will matter. Each day it’s starting to get hotter and hotter. In Houston, Texas families live by refinery companies and suffer every day with health problems because of the toxic chemicals in the air that they breathe in. Climate change has gotten worse and worse over the years. We the people who live on earth need to speak more about climate change and figure out a way to stop it.Climate change makes me feel worried about our Earth because it can get to the point where we will not have a place to live, and that makes me wonder if I am going to have a future. Climate change increases the health issues for people. Some of the health problems that people face are heat stroke, kidney disease, heart disease, and pregnancy complications. These problems affect us a lot because they can end up causing us to die. Climate change is a problem we must discuss more. People do not focus on the problems that climate change causes. Taking steps toward positively impacting the environment is something we need to do to end climate change. We might not be able to fix what happened in the past, but we can try and make the future better for everyone else. Make sure that you do not throw trash in the ocean, take the bus, etc. There are multiple ways to stop climate change. Younger people will have a better life if people try to help the Earth. - Evelyn NunezUriel MataClimate change is a serious problem as it’s affecting both people and the environment, heatwaves, droughts, crops drying, sea water levels increasing, and natural disasters becoming more common are some of the effects on the environment.Global warming is one of the worst and most impacting forms of climate change as this year many cities across Texas experienced triple-digit record temperatures! Also natural disasters such as hurricanes are occurring out of hurricane season due to the change in temperature. This is also causing glaciers to melt which leads sea water levels to rise while also putting many species in danger. Increase in temperatures is also causing many health problems such as heat exhaustion, heat strokes, and respiratory issues which is mainly affecting people with asthma. These extreme temperature conditions are greatly affecting my community not only physically but economically as well. Farmers and outside workers can’t work in such harsh temperatures as it is far too dangerous leading to decrease in money and jobs. Many people in my community have experienced the intense heat including myself, I witnessed an intense heatwave that forced people to carry water to avoid dehydration. I am greatly concerned about the climate circumstances we are in and what will be of the future, because if global warming isn’t taken care of it will only get hotter and hotter which is worse not only for us but for the future generations to come.In order to address climate change, it is important that we avoid releasing damaging chemicals and gasses in the air that harm the environment. The gasses are mainly released by factories and refineries therefore, they should be cautious of the amounts of gasses they’re releasing. If there is anybody who can help improve the circumstances it’s the government. The government’s actions might help improve the situation however, we can’t sit with our arms crossed as we are capable of helping too. - Uriel MataMelani Caceres-CaballeroI am writing to discuss the dangerous effects climate change has on people. This topic is an issue because everyone on earth is affected by this. Even the little ants to the big lions, everyone is experiencing climate change.Each year the summer is hotter than the earlier one. This year Houston broke a record for seeing the hottest temperature it's seen of 109 degrees. Of course, in this case breaking a record is not a good thing at all. This affects mostly the people in Houston, since a lot of people in Houston work jobs that are outdoors. For example, my dad works in construction so he must be outside for his job. He comes home exhausted from the heat but that’s what he has to do to provide for us. This makes me concerned for the future, how much longer will this have to go on? Will we be able to survive another extremely scorching summer? In order to address climate change, it is important that the city of Houston attempts to use less nonrenewable resources. These nonrenewable resources cause greenhouse gasses to be released into our atmosphere and that’s what makes our earth warm up. The government should have stricter regulations. (Texas Governor) Greg Abbot has passed a bill that cars will no longer need to be inspected. This means that they do not need to do the emissions tests anymore. The emissions tests are there to make sure your car isn’t a contributor to air pollution. Greg Abbott passing this law means that there will be more cars that have high emissions and will be contributors to air pollution. Our lives and our future are in the government’s hands. I want people to understand that you cannot just look away from this issue, this is something that you cannot run from. One thing we can call do is use less electricity. Such as, unplugging your charger before you leave work or school. Since electricity is also used by nonrenewable resources. - Melani Caceres-CaballeroEvelyn G. Ramirez LoredoThe issue is that we humans are causing climate change. How? You might ask yourself, well by polluting our earth, by not recycling, or throwing away trash, using too much of something like plastic, burning fossil fuels, trees, or things that can’t be recycled, because of that it is causing extreme weather. This is a problem, and although not everyone realizes that it is, others can because they lose their homes and loved ones because of extreme weather.For example, I live in Houston, Tx which is near the Gulf of Mexico at Galveston. Since the sea levels are rising there is a risk that Houston will submerge. This is scary for me because maybe one day Houston won’t exist anymore, my home, the place where I grew up at. Another example is that here in Houston, Texas in the Spring Branch area there was a fire of burning trees and what not. Personally I wasn’t affected by it, but the people that live around there were. Smoke was getting in their home to the point where they couldn’t breathe and had to evacuate their home. As I stated above, I am scared. I'm scared that Houston won't be here to show my kids where I grew up. I'm scared that my home will just be in the past. I'm scared that these fires will become a common thing risking kids, adults and family's health. To address climate change, it is important that the world knows what's happening so that they know how to act if in any way they get affected by climate change. Not everyone knows what's happening because it's not being translated in their language, so journalists need to start translating reports that they do on climate change so that those that don’t speak English know what's happening because we are all humans that live in the same world. We all have a right to know about this to help to stop this problem. Climate change is not something to ignore because sooner or later we are all going to be more affected by it if we don’t do something fast.- Evelyn G. Ramirez Loredo

GoGreenNation News: Urban farming's climate impact may be overstated, says study
GoGreenNation News: Urban farming's climate impact may be overstated, says study

Despite recent headlines, a study finds urban farming's climate villain reputation may be undeserved, spotlighting the nuances of its environmental impact.Lisa Held reports for Civil Eats.In short:Misinterpretations of a research study have led to unfair criticisms of urban farming's climate impact, overlooking the study's actual findings.The distinction between urban farms and community gardens significantly affects greenhouse gas emission comparisons, with urban farms showing competitive carbon footprints when considered separately.Infrastructure contributes majorly to carbon emissions in urban farming, suggesting potential for reduction through sustainable practices and materials.Key quote:"The most important sustainability challenge of our time is climate change, and if we’re gonna talk about sustainability in the context of urban agriculture, we have to talk about carbon emissions."— Jason Hawes, Ph.D. student at the University of MichiganWhy this matters:Urban farming, the practice of cultivating, processing, and distributing food in or around urban areas, holds significant potential for mitigating climate change impacts. This innovative approach to agriculture offers a sustainable pathway for cities, contributing to reduced greenhouse gas emissions, enhanced carbon sequestration, and improved overall urban environmental health.For more than 150 years, from the rural South to northern cities, Black people have used farming to build self-determined communities and resist oppressive structures that tear them down.

GoGreenNation News: Election outcomes won't shift climate goals, Cop29 leader says
GoGreenNation News: Election outcomes won't shift climate goals, Cop29 leader says

At the upcoming UN climate summit, Cop29, the newly elected leaders around the world will be expected to uphold the same stringent climate commitments as their predecessors, emphasizing the universal urgency of addressing global warming.Fiona Harvey reports for The Guardian.In short:Cop29, slated for November in Azerbaijan, comes after a pivotal election year globally, stressing the continuity of climate obligations regardless of political changes.Mukhtar Babayev, the incoming president of Cop29, remains optimistic about maintaining progress on climate objectives, urging for global cooperation and commitment.Amidst increasing global temperatures, the summit aims to keep the focus on the crucial 1.5C goal, highlighting the role of both public and private sectors in achieving a green transition.Key quote:“I don’t think that any election will change the policy of any countries to move forward the consolidation of these issues [on the climate].”— Mukhtar Babayev, incoming president of Cop29Why this matters:The insistence on holding newly elected governments to their climate commitments reflects the global consensus on the imperative to combat climate change. This stance, especially in a year marked by significant elections and potential political shifts, emphasizes the continuous effort required to achieve and sustain global environmental goals, directly impacting health outcomes by mitigating the effects of climate change.Be sure to check out EHN’s audio diaries from COP28: Part 1 and Part 2.

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