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GoGreenNation News: New opportunities with the American Climate Corps launching soon
GoGreenNation News: New opportunities with the American Climate Corps launching soon

The Biden administration is set to open the American Climate Corps jobs board next month, offering a range of positions aimed at addressing climate change and environmental conservation.Naveena Sadasivam and Kate Yoder report for Grist.In short:The program, inspired by the New Deal's Civilian Conservation Corps, will initially offer hundreds of jobs, with plans to hire 20,000 young people in its first year.Positions will cover various fields including energy efficiency, disaster response, recycling, and wildfire mitigation, with no experience required for most jobs.Strong public support is seen for the program, with a majority of voters across political lines backing the initiative and many young people showing interest.Key quote:“There’s an incredible demand signal from young people who we see as being put on a pathway to good-paying careers.”— Maggie Thomas, special assistant to the president for climate changeWhy this matters:This initiative is a cooperative effort involving multiple federal agencies, including AmeriCorps, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, and the Departments of Labor, Interior, Agriculture, and Energy. Its primary aim is to mobilize over 20,000 young Americans, equipping them with the skills needed for future careers in public service or the private sector focused on environmental conservation, clean energy, and climate resilience.Not everyone is supportive of the American climate corps, even politicians who are typically pro-jobs.

GoGreenNation News: Indigenous land rights crucial for climate success
GoGreenNation News: Indigenous land rights crucial for climate success

Giving Indigenous communities greater control over their lands significantly improves conservation results, according to a new study in One Earth. Anita Hofschneider reports for Grist. In short:Researchers analyzed 648 studies of conservation areas, comparing the ecological and social outcomes based on the degree of Indigenous involvement.The study found that recognizing Indigenous autonomy leads to significantly better environmental and social results than merely treating them as stakeholders.Examples include successful conservation in Chile’s Los Lagos Indigenous Marine Areas and ineffective efforts in China’s Hainan province due to lack of Indigenous involvement. Key quote: “The findings reveal that more equitable governance, based on equal partnership or primary control for [Indigenous peoples and local communities], are associated with significantly more positive ecological outcomes.” — Study authors Why this matters: Indigenous communities have long been the stewards of vast tracts of land, preserving biodiversity and maintaining ecological balance through traditional knowledge and sustainable practices. Studies indicate that these lands support healthier ecosystems and store more carbon, an important factor in mitigating climate change. However, these benefits are jeopardized when Indigenous land rights are overlooked or violated. Related EHN coverage: Opinion: Protecting Indigenous children means protecting water Colonialism, the climate crisis, and the need to center Indigenous voices Hands on the land, heart in community: Returning cultural fires

GoGreenNation News: Jane Goodall reflects on hope and youth's role in environmental activism
GoGreenNation News: Jane Goodall reflects on hope and youth's role in environmental activism

On her 90th birthday, Jane Goodall shares insights on environmental conservation, emphasizing the critical role of hope and youth activism in addressing climate change and biodiversity loss.Rhett A. Butler reports for Mongabay.In short:Goodall discusses the significance of fostering hope amidst environmental challenges, using the metaphor of navigating towards a shining star of hope.She underscores the impact of youth engagement in environmental activism, advocating for their influence on elections and policy changes.Goodall highlights her journey and contributions to primatology and conservation, stressing the importance of empathy and understanding in our relationship with the natural world.Key quote:"I’ve come to think of humanity as being at the mouth of a very long very dark tunnel and right at the end there’s a little star shining. And that’s hope."— Jane Goodall, primatologist and environmental advocateWhy this matters:Jane Goodall's legacy is vast and profoundly influential, not just within the realms of primatology and environmental conservation, but also in shaping public perceptions about our relationship with the natural world. Beyond her scientific achievements, Goodall is renowned for her unwavering optimism and belief in the power of young people to effect change.Our global systems, which are designed for perpetual growth, need to be fundamentally restructured to avoid the worst-case outcome.

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