GoGreenNation ENVIRONMENTAL NEWS

Lost Local News: Stories in Danger, as Told by Local Journalists

News Feed
Tuesday, November 30, 2021

The state of local journalism is widely, and correctly, understood to be grim. About 2,200 local print newspapers have closed since 2005, and the number of newspaper journalists fell by more than half between 2008 and 2020. In many places where papers still exist, a lack of resources prevents them from reporting thoroughly on issues vital to the community — issues like public safety, education and local politics.

Plenty of local and national outlets are working mightily to fill in the gaps created by the diminished state of local news: nonprofit regional newsrooms, local radio and TV stations, digital news sites and national organizations with branches dedicated to supporting community journalism. In the years to come, many more efforts along these lines will be needed — at the national level, the grass-roots level and everywhere in between. Because when we lose local journalism, we lose a fabric that holds together communities; we lose crucial information that allows democracy to function; and at the most basic level, we lose stories that need to be told.

Many environmental stories, especially on the effects of climate change, are among the overlooked stories.


Read the full story here
Photos courtesy of
recent ARTICLES
January 17, 2022
Billionaire Wealth Has Soared As Millions Fell Into Poverty During Pandemic: Oxfam

During the pandemic, women were especially economically hard-hit because many work in industries with disproportionate job losses; others were forced to leave work to care for children and elders. Women collectively lost $800 billion in earnings in 2020, and there are 13 million fewer women in the workforce now than in 2019. The COVID-19 pandemic has hit people of color disproportionately hard, the report noted: Through November 2021, in the U.S, Black and Latinx people were about twice as likely to die from the virus than white people. Similarly, during England’s second wave of the pandemic, Bangladeshi people were five times more likely to die of COVID-19 than white Brits. In Brazil, Black people were 1.5 times more likely to die than white people. In the U.S, Black and Latinx people also work disproportionately in industries like the service or domestic sectors, which faced significant job loss, as well as in health care or agriculture, where workers deemed “essential” continued to work on the front lines as others stayed safely home. Millions of Americans received increased unemployment aid and three stimulus checks from the federal government during the pandemic, but undocumented immigrants were barred from this support. “There is no shortage of money... There is only a shortage of courage and imagination needed to break free from the failed, deadly straitjacket of extreme neoliberalism,” Oxfam International’s executive director Gabriela Bucher said in a news release. “Governments would be wise to listen to the movements — the young climate strikers, Black Lives Matter activists, #NiUnaMenos feminists, Indian farmers and others — who are demanding justice and equality.”

Our team is always growing.
Become a partner, volunteer, sponsor, or intern today.
Let us know how you would like to get involved!

CONTACT US
Sign up for our mailing list to stay informed on the latest films and environmental headlines.
Thank you! Your submission has been received!
Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form.